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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
November 06, 1978
DIAMOND ANNIVERSARY Sir:While reading my baseball encyclopedia, I realized that not only did the New York Yankees win the World Series this year to commemorate the 75th anniversary of baseball's most prestigious event, but they also won the 25th World Series (in 1928 over the Cardinals) and the 50th World Series (in 1953 over the Dodgers). This may be pure coincidence, but when the year 2003 rolls around and baseball celebrates its 100th World Series, I'll have to go with the Yankees.ALAN SCHUTTENorfolk, Va.
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November 06, 1978

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Cosmos

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Roughnecks

4

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12

10

DIAMOND ANNIVERSARY
Sir:
While reading my baseball encyclopedia, I realized that not only did the New York Yankees win the World Series this year to commemorate the 75th anniversary of baseball's most prestigious event, but they also won the 25th World Series (in 1928 over the Cardinals) and the 50th World Series (in 1953 over the Dodgers). This may be pure coincidence, but when the year 2003 rolls around and baseball celebrates its 100th World Series, I'll have to go with the Yankees.
ALAN SCHUTTE
Norfolk, Va.

GOOD HEAVENS!
Sir:
In your Oct. 23 issue, Herman Weiskopf advises us that Jerome Heavens has "supplanted George Gipp as the top running back in Notre Dame history" (An Upsetting Time for the Top Ten).

Could this mean a break with tradition and that henceforth the Devine call to rally the team before leaving the locker room will be "Let's win one for Heavens' sake"?
BOB MACCARTEE
Coronado, Calif.

LACROIX
Sir:
My thanks to Bruce Newman for his fine article on Andre Lacroix, the superb center of the New England Whalers (Man on the Move, Oct. 23). Lacroix was a major factor in helping the WHA achieve a 16-7-3 exhibition record against the NHL this season, once again showing that the WHA is just as exciting and competitive as the other league.
TOM SEALE
Columbiana, Ala.

Sir:
Judging from Bruce Newman's article, it seems that the WHA's alltime leading scorer has found himself a permanent home here in New England, with a financially stable hockey club. The disasters that have accompanied Lacroix throughout his long career may finally cross Climax Road into the graveyard, eh?
GAYLE VEZINA
West Hartford, Conn.

Sir:
In his otherwise fine article, Bruce Newman makes an unfortunate reference to "hockey's maddening rhetorical 'eh?" It isn't hockey's rhetorical "eh?" It's Canada's rhetorical "eh?" If Newman will cultivate some Canadians other than the slap-shooting ones, he'll find that to be true.

Moreover, to call the expression "maddening" is gratuitous and snippy. Newman should consider how America's "you know?" sounds to Canadians. Eh?
ALEX VAUGHN
Old Lyme, Conn.

DOG PACKS
Sir:
I grew up in the wilderness of northern Maine, and I still remember the anger and, yes, even the horror I felt then when talk of dog packs running deer brought out .30-30s and .30-06s. I pass no judgment as to whether the dogs or the men were right or wrong—there are times when reason takes flight and instinct answers anger—but my sympathies lie with Jack Curtis, the author of your story Horror in a High Country (Oct. 23). I trust I will not be labeled inhumane or anticanine; I care a great deal for my own dog.

Curtis' story may not be the best you've published, but it ranks up there with such recent ones as William Humphrey's Prodigy in a Puddle (Sept. 18), Clive Gammon's A Date with Nemesis (Oct. 2) and all of Frank Deford's stuff. Sometimes I think you do as much for literature as you do for sport. Now, can you do something about inflation?
(THE REV.) GENE HENDERSON
Albany, N.Y.

Sir:
Horror in a High Country should be required reading for all dog owners who permit their pets to run free. It is a fine description of the pack instinct of some animals.
ROY D. WILLIAMS
Dearborn, Mich.

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