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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
November 27, 1978
PENN STATE'S NUMBERSir:I have just read John Underwood's account of the Penn State-Maryland game (A Lionized Defense, Nov. 13), and I loved it. Seeing the game on TV was great, but reading the article was even better. Long live Penn State Coach Joe Paterno!ERIC RIDDLE Boca Raton, Fla.
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November 27, 1978

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sir:
Cale Yarborough.
KEITH (CATFISH) SMITH
Miami

Sir:
Nancy Lopez.
MARY ANN PAGAN
Fremont, Calif.

Sir:
As William Leggett stated so well in his account of Exceller's victory in the Jockey Club Gold Cup (Exceller Exceeds Himself, Oct. 23), " Bill Shoemaker. What is there left to say about him? At 47 and in his 30th year as a jockey, he seems to be getting better with each furlong pole he passes."
BERT FRISBEE
Alamo, Calif.

Sir:
Speed Skater Eric Heiden.
STAN ESPERAAS
Kristiansand, Norway

Sir:
Henry Rono.
ALBERT CILONE
New York City

NORTHWESTERN WOMEN
Sir:
Jerry Kirshenbaum's article on Northwestern (Waa-Mu! Waa-Who? Oct. 30) was written with a great deal of insight into the problems of athletics at our institution. But I think it is unfortunate that the piece failed to stress one of the more positive aspects of sports at NU—the success of the women's program. The women's fencing team, for example, went undefeated in dual-meet competition in 1977, has won the Big Ten championship for the last two years and qualified for the National Intercollegiate Women's Fencing Association nationals in 1977, placing 13th, and in 1978, when they placed 12th. Clearly, not all is negative at Northwestern.
LAURENCE D. SCHILLER
Fencing Coach
Northwestern University
Evanston, Ill.

Sir:
I would like to add a name to the list of famed athletes who attended Northwestern back when NU was more athletically inclined. The name belongs to the first U.S. Olympic-gold medalist in women's track and field. The "fastest lady runner" in 1928, she won the women's 100-meter dash in 12.2. She received another gold in the women's 400-meter relay in 1936, despite having suffered a near-crippling injury in a plane crash in the interim. She is in the record books as Elizabeth Robinson and is my mother, Betty Schwartz.
JAINE R. S. HAMILTON
Novato, Calif.

KING SALMON
Sir:
Michael Baughman's article on Chinook salmon fishing (Get the Lead Out of Your Line, Oct. 23) was especially interesting to me because our family owns a cabin on the upper Rogue River. Upstream from us, the Rogue sweeps broadly, almost boringly, at a calm, uniform depth of 18 inches or 36 inches or 72 inches, depending on the season and recent rainfall or snowmelt. Downstream, the river tumbles and boils in a confusion of white water too swift and rocky to serve as more than brief passage for fisher and fished.

But in front of our cabin the Rogue is perfect. We can stand in knee-deep water and have access to all sweet spots with the lightest tackle. One can hook a Chinook with a red ant on an eight-pound leader, and fight it carefully, achingly for two hours until the exhausted fish lies atop the water, and still, during the attempt to bank the salmon for touching, bragging and release, have him break the leader. What does man know of spirit?

Enough of this. My purpose in writing was simply to notify Baughman that upriver spawning areas on the Rogue are closed to bait, lures and weighted-fly fishing during most of the spawning season.

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