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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
March 05, 1979
POSTMORTEMSSir:Was the article Run Over by the Big Red Machine (Feb. 19) about the Soviet-NHL Challenge Cup written by E. M. Swift or by E. M. Swiftski? Granted, the U.S.S.R. won the series and whipped the NHL All-Stars in the third game, but did he have to praise the Soviets so much? Swift(ski) made them seem nonpareil and the NHL seem like dirt when the situation was not all that horrendous. This was the Soviet National Team, which has practiced and played together a lot longer than the NHL squad.NEAL BOUDETTE Pompton Plains, N.J.
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March 05, 1979

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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As far as Washington knew at the time, Tomjanovich was coming across the court to break his face open, and all Washington did was beat him to the punch. That is called self-defense, not sucker-punching.
SHARION TIPLER
Jackson, Miss.

Sir:
Frank Deford calls Moses Malone "the first to make a name in the craft of offensive rebounding." Come on! Remember ex-Celtic and now Seattle SuperSonic Paul Silas?
JON SZAREK
Manchester, N. H.

LORDS OF THE POOL
Sir:
What a magnificent article on the Kenyon College swimming team (It's a Real Campus Haunt, Feb. 19). The two paragraphs on Tom Edwards, Kenyon coach from 1955 through 1964, characterized him as "a skilled technician." Tom was also a skilled swimmer. What you failed to mention and may not even know is that every year near the end of the season Tom would challenge anyone and everyone on the team to a 25-yard sprint in the pool. During my four years at Kenyon he was never defeated. Edwards truly reflects the spirit of Kenyon College swimming.
GRANT A. MASON JR., M.D.
Co-captain
1958-59 Kenyon Swimming Team
Canton, Ohio

Sir:
As a Kenyon College alumnus (class of '76), I was pleased to see our swimmers and swimming tradition finally get their due. As a former student-photographer, let me congratulate Heinz Kluetmeier on his photographs. In addition to the drawbacks of Shaffer Pool that were mentioned, it is almost impossible to photograph in there on a cold day because the condensation coats one's lenses with a fine mist. In four years I shot many a team picture out of doors.
JIM FRANK
New York City

Sir:
Concerning Kenyon's 26-year dominance of the Ohio Athletic Conference in swimming, your readers may be interested to know that Kalamazoo College has won or shared 40 consecutive Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association tennis championships since 1936 (there was an interruption during the war years). Thirty-nine of those championships were won outright, and the only shared title dates back to 1962.

Even more amazing is Kalamazoo's dual-meet record against MIAA tennis teams since 1936. The Hornets are currently on a 95-meet winning streak against league competition, and since 1936 they have a 250-1 record. Kalamazoo is the defending NCAA Division III tennis champion.
THOMAS L. RENNER
MIAA Publicist
Holland, Mich.

SULLIVAN AWARDS
Sir:
Is swimming really overrepresented among Sullivan Award winners (SCORECARD. Feb. 19)? In terms of numbers of athletes involved, it probably ranks at or near the top among amateur sports in this country.

Why haven't the names of Tony Dorsett, Earl Campbell, John McEnroe. Nancy Lopez or Tracy Austin been among the 10 finalists? Perhaps it was because they had already received ample recognition and could look forward to receiving awards such as the Heisman (with all the associated hoopla) and annual paychecks in the six-digit range. How can the AAU give an award for amateur athletics to athletes who'll be paid more money the next year than the President of the United States? The 1978 winner, Tracy Caulkins, is and probably always will be purely amateur; there's no pot of gold on her horizon.
STUART CORLISS
Memphis

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