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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
March 05, 1979
POSTMORTEMSSir:Was the article Run Over by the Big Red Machine (Feb. 19) about the Soviet-NHL Challenge Cup written by E. M. Swift or by E. M. Swiftski? Granted, the U.S.S.R. won the series and whipped the NHL All-Stars in the third game, but did he have to praise the Soviets so much? Swift(ski) made them seem nonpareil and the NHL seem like dirt when the situation was not all that horrendous. This was the Soviet National Team, which has practiced and played together a lot longer than the NHL squad.NEAL BOUDETTE Pompton Plains, N.J.
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March 05, 1979

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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POSTMORTEMS
Sir:
Was the article Run Over by the Big Red Machine (Feb. 19) about the Soviet-NHL Challenge Cup written by E. M. Swift or by E. M. Swiftski? Granted, the U.S.S.R. won the series and whipped the NHL All-Stars in the third game, but did he have to praise the Soviets so much? Swift(ski) made them seem nonpareil and the NHL seem like dirt when the situation was not all that horrendous. This was the Soviet National Team, which has practiced and played together a lot longer than the NHL squad.
NEAL BOUDETTE
Pompton Plains, N.J.

Sir:
Give the Stanley Cup to the Soviets? Is E. M. Swift kidding? Let the Soviet National Team play a series against the Canadiens or the Bruins and see who wins. You can't put a team together in a couple of weeks and expect it to play as well as a team that has played together for months.
PAUL LUBERTAZZI
Nutley, N.J.

Sir:
Why not let the Soviets compete in the NHL for a year before giving them the Stanley Cup?
BRYAN S. MATHENY
Aurora, Colo.

Sir:
After viewing Game 3 of the Challenge Cup, I came to the conclusion that the powers of the NHL and of North American hockey in general may want to take a serious look at the style of hockey the Soviets displayed. They clearly showed that you don't have to half-kill the opposing team by overchecking, fighting and roughhousing to win games and make the sport exciting.

The Canadians may have invented the game, but it appears the Soviets have perfected it.
E. A. JOSEPH
Leetsdale, Pa.

?See page 20.—ED.

MOSES MALONE
Sir:
The article on Moses Malone by Frank Deford (Bounding into Prominence, Feb. 19) is one of the best I have ever read in your magazine. It shows how much Moses is misunderstood by the general public. But being a native Texan makes me proud, and I am sure most Texans do not appreciate Deford's referring to Houston as a "booming, sprawling, crawling, ugly city," or even as a "gumdrop city." Otherwise, it was a well-deserved article on the best center in the NBA.
DOUG BAKER
Houston

Sir:
I highly enjoyed Frank Deford's article on Moses Malone. I'm sure that many of your readers were touched by this gentle giant, as I was. But let us hope that Malone always stays grateful for what he has and wisely uses the power that comes with money.
BRIAN SCHERMAN
East Williston, N.Y.

Sir:
The article on Houston's Moses Malone is the most beautiful account of the life and career of an athlete that I have ever read. He is a superstar in every sense of the word.

In my opinion, the only low point of the article was Frank Deford's statement about Rudy Tomjanovich's being sucker-punched. It seems that because Rudy T was the one who received extensive injuries instead of Kermit Washington, Washington automatically comes off as the bad guy.

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