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Losing the title singlehandedly
Pat Putnam
April 23, 1979
Right hand broken, Mike Rossman carried on with his left, but after nine rounds it was clear that Victor Galindez was back
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April 23, 1979

Losing The Title Singlehandedly

Right hand broken, Mike Rossman carried on with his left, but after nine rounds it was clear that Victor Galindez was back

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"O.K., that's it," DePiano said. "The fight is over. Let's get out of here."

When Galindez heard the news, he came roaring out of his corner—and he fell down. Leaping up, he charged Rossman, screaming taunts. Finally his people grabbed him and pulled him away.

In his dressing room, waiting to be taken to a local hospital where the hand would be put in a cast, Rossman said he had thrown that last right hand in pure desperation.

"I said, 'Hey, I've got to go for it,' " he said. "I couldn't just stand out there and go jab, jab, jab when he's throwing bombs. I was going crazy. I could see these big openings over his jab and I couldn't throw the right."

In his dressing room, the jubilant Galindez was telling the world that he would never fight Rossman again. "He chickened up" Galindez shouted. "He's a chicken. I'll never give him a rematch."

It was pointed out that Rossman had given him a return. "I got a rematch because I deserved it," Galindez said. "I won't give him one, because he doesn't deserve it."

That creates an interesting situation. After Galindez had been stopped on cuts last September, the Latin-oriented WBA immediately installed him as its No. 1 challenger. That made it mandatory that Rossman fight him again within six months. Now that Rossman has lost the championship—undoubtedly in part because of a broken hand—one has to wonder where he will be ranked among the WBA's contenders.

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