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Muy loco down in San Antone
John Papanek
May 14, 1979
Larry Kenon and fellow Spur egos have enfevered a win-starved populace
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May 14, 1979

Muy Loco Down In San Antone

Larry Kenon and fellow Spur egos have enfevered a win-starved populace

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It has been that way all of his career, beginning in Birmingham, Ala., where he played just one year of high school basketball after growing from 6'0" to 6'7" in a year and a half. Following a stint at Amarillo ( Texas) Junior College, he went to Memphis State where, in his one season, 1972-73, he took the team from obscurity to the NCAA finals. That game in the St. Louis Checkerdome was one of the more memorable finals, but not for anything Kenon did. That was the game in which UCLA's Walton had what many remember as the greatest individual college game ever played—hitting 21 of 22 field-goal attempts. "Well, it wasn't me who checked him," says Kenon.

From there Kenon joined the ABA's New York Nets and became a rookie starter opposite Erving, after whom he had been named "Dr. K" at Memphis State. That year the Nets won the ABA championship, and Kenon was demoted to Mr. K, "as the Nets already had a Doctor," he says.

Kenon was inspired by Erving's balletic game and took some vestiges of it with him when he was traded to San Antonio in 1975. He has played in the last two NBA All-Star games, but only now, as the Spurs finally get the attention they should have gotten long ago, is Kenon getting any real notice.

"Some people say I'm cocky," says Kenon. "I know that's how I sound. But I know the difference between cocky and confident. I don't want anybody to think that I'm flying off the handle. Like I say, people can just watch me and make up their own minds."

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