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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
July 23, 1979
FAVORITE SONSir:It's about time Dave Winfield got the recognition he deserves (Good Hit, Better Man, July 9). He is one of the nicest men you would ever want to meet, and his work with youngsters here has won him friends, fans and followers. San Diego loves Dave Winfield, and Dave Winfield loves San Diego.BRIAN D. ROGERS San Diego
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July 23, 1979

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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FAVORITE SON
Sir:
It's about time Dave Winfield got the recognition he deserves (Good Hit, Better Man, July 9). He is one of the nicest men you would ever want to meet, and his work with youngsters here has won him friends, fans and followers. San Diego loves Dave Winfield, and Dave Winfield loves San Diego.
BRIAN D. ROGERS
San Diego

Sir:
I quote from An Ugly Affair in Minneapolis, published in your Best of Sports Illustrated I: " Dave Winfield, who recently joined the Gopher varsity, joined the fray, too, dodging to midcourt, where some Minnesota reserves were trying to wrestle Ohio State substitute Mark Wagar to the floor. Winfield leaped on top of Wagar when he was down and hit him five times with his right fist on the face and head." I think San Diego should take another look at its favorite son.
NED LASNICK
Rockville, Md.

?Following the 1972 all-court brawl, two Minnesota players were suspended for the season, but Winfield was not penalized.—ED.

JACK'S TROUBLES
Sir:
I suspect there is nothing wrong with Jack Nicklaus (Jack Comes To Grips With Topic A. July 9), except that he has come down to the level of golf the rest of the pros play on.
RONALD SELEPAK
Arlington, Va.

Sir:
Nicklaus seems to have created a Catch-22 situation for himself—if he plays frequently, he loses his zest for the game; if he plays seldom, he loses his competitive edge. It appears he must recognize that his business successes are the result of his golfing prowess. When the latter declines, so will the former. Age is not a factor, as witness Player's three consecutive victories last season and Boros' 1963 U.S. Open triumph at age 43.
GEORGE F. PLAITS
Ormond Beach, Fla.

Sir:
Barry McDermott's comments on Nicklaus' putting miseries reminded me of a very appropriate remark made by Winnie Palmer a few years ago.

While agonizing over her husband's slide she said, "When you're young you think you will never miss a putt. But when you get to be about 35 you begin to think you can never make one."

Seems as though the wives of the two great golfers have a more realistic understanding of their husbands' problems than anyone. They both used to will the ball into the hole when they putted. But that doesn't seem to work anymore, and they and the game suffer because of it.
NELLIE KINO
Pittsburgh

CITY LIMITS
Sir:
Frank Deford missed the crux of the Washington sports dilemma (A Home Without Hometowners, July 2). The greater metropolitan Washington area may be the eighth largest in the country, but it is still not capable of providing total support for four pro teams as well as teams from the Universities of Maryland and Virginia (basketball and football), Navy (football) plus Georgetown and George Washington Universities (both into bigtime college basketball). Our fans are fine. Just don't expect us to fill up every seat for every sport.
STEVEN GITELMAN
Short Hills, N.J.

NET GAIN
Sir:
SI should award a Father of the Year trophy, for which the hands-down early leader has got to be Andrea Jaeger's father, Roland (Brace Yourself, Tracy, July 9). After all, buying his own two teen-age daughters ice cream even when they lost tennis matches must come under the heading of above and beyond, well, something. I wonder how many readers of SI were affected, as I was, by that line. I salute you, Mr. Jaeger. You're beautiful, and I hope the kids truly appreciated both the ice cream and your kindness.
R. T. CONNORS
Boston

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