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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
August 20, 1979
ENERGY VS. THE ENVIRONMENT (CONT.)Sir:"The Rockies May Crumble..." (SCORECARD, July 30) is a catchy appraisal of President Carter's synthetic-fuels program, but I suggest that it exaggerates the environmental risks implied. That the Rockies will be leveled is less jest than nonsense.
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August 20, 1979

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sir:
I am from Colorado. My wife is from Wyoming. We now live in Montana. I have traveled extensively in Utah.

Big business and big government had better be ready for a war with the people of the Rocky Mountain region because we will not allow the East and West coasts to sacrifice our states so that they may continue their obscene waste of our precious resources.
THOMAS L. HALL, M.D.
Lame Deer, Mont.

Sir:
You should be commended for pointing out the environmental dangers involved in the new energy policy proposed by President Carter. We have reached a sad state if we are willing to scar much of our most beautiful land and threaten our own health in order to obtain just another finite energy source.
DENNY MAIER
Clarksville, Ind.

THE AMERICANIZATION OF SOCCER
Sir:
In regard to J.D. Reed's article, Tea Party Brewing in the NASL (Aug. 6), I must agree that, on the whole, American soccer is still not on a par with that played in foreign countries. But I think that Ricky Davis was given far less respect than he deserves in the article. Anyone who watched the Cosmos-Aztecs game played in the Rose Bowl on Aug. 1 saw Davis score two goals, the second one coming on a magnificent scissors kick that Colin Boulton (1.22 goals-against average for the Aztecs) never even saw until it was in the net.
TIM SWEENEY
Sciota, Pa.

Sir:
I think American soccer players like Nick Owcharuk, Ricky Davis, Bobby Smith and Kyle Rote Jr. should be more patient. Without Pel� and other foreign superstars, the NASL would not be where it is today. In the end, the foreign players are the main attraction. Give it some more time, Americans. Our day will come.
BRAD SCHERR
Morris Plains, N.J.

MOVING MOVIE
Sir:
After viewing the movie Breaking Away, I left the theater mesmerized by the film's beauty and message. Later, during my habitual late-Friday, early-Saturday reading of SI, I was delighted by Frank Deford's review (MOVIES, Aug. 6). Deford captured the essence of the film as perfectly as the film captured the essence of America. Not only should Bobby Knight, Billy Martin, et al. see the film, but why not take Deford's suggestion one step further and persuade the networks to show it simultaneously during prime time? The American "Crisis in Confidence" would do art immediate about-face. Breaking Away is a tribute to America; Deford's review is a tribute to the film.
J. BART SCOTTEN
Overland Park, Kans.

BIG LIFT
Sir:
Terry Todd's article on Larry Pacifico (Long Lift the King, Aug. 6) was one of the finest to appear in any magazine on the subject of powerlifting. Because he is a former world champion, Todd brings special insight and understanding to his description of the life and lifting of the King. Having witnessed the lifting of Pacifico, I know that his great strength is exceeded only by his determination and grace under pressure.
ED MILLER
Raleigh, N.C.

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