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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
August 27, 1979
MOMENTS AND MEMORIESSir:Thanks so much for your Silver Anniversary Issue (Aug. 13) and the remembrance of things past. As the daughter of a charter subscriber—I think the first issue is still in the top drawer of the china cabinet back home—I fondly recall the glory of those early issues of SI. They may have been "exotic" and patrician, but they were good. The full-color photos of America's Cup races and Kentucky Derbies seemed awesome to a fifth-grader in a small city in western Pennsylvania.JOAN E. BEHRENSRancho Palos Verdes, Calif.
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August 27, 1979

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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BANNISTER'S VIEW
Sir:
Sir Roger Bannister is a remarkable human being—a late-20th-century Renaissance man. His forceful, insightful essay, Beyond the Barrier, in the Aug. 13 issue covered the two most important dimensions of sport: the special world of the elite athlete, i.e., the Olympian, and the multifaceted world of "sport-for-all." Bannister's essential message is that mankind is the better for having enlarged both these dimensions.

Dr. Bannister will be in the U.S. Feb. 8-10 for an Olympic Games symposium at Skid-more College. The meetings will be open to the public. As a sport historian, I look forward to sharing the speaker's platform with Sir Roger, a uniquely cosmopolitan man.
JOHN LUCAS
Professor of Physical Education
Penn State University
State College, Pa.

Sir:
Roger Bannister's mile! It made a welcome wave and washed the world with hope. I felt it then and for years afterward.

And I felt, too, something of Bob Beamon's awe when, on television, I saw him cover his face with his hands after his prodigious leap.

Now, after reading Sir Roger's lofty footnote in your Silver Anniversary Issue about Beamon's jump being "altitude assisted," I wonder: How does Sir Roger take his record—with one asterisk (pacesetter Chris Chataway), or two (pacesetter Chris Brasher)?
FRED PEARCE
Aspen, Colo.

UNCLE ARBRIA'S PHILOSOPHY
Sir:
About halfway through The Peach Brandy Man (Aug. 13), I asked myself: What's this doing in a sports magazine? By the time I had finished the article. I could only say thank you, thank you.

A real sportsman will always have time to entertain the Uncle Arbrias of this world. Yes, Don Sutton is a fine man. And Phillip Timothy Gay is a fine writer.
GARY BLEVINS
Forth Worth

Sir:
The Peach Brandy Man was one of the most heartwarming and interesting stories I have ever read. Arbria Johnson's philosophy concerning man's relationship to his fellowman is very similar to my own: if you like a person, "it don't matter 'bout color, never has."
ROBBYE W. TUCKER
Melbourne, Fla.

Sir:
Phillip Gay's article was a wonderful story about a wonderful man.
JAMIE HINMAN
Pittsburgh

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