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YOU CAN'T BE A STICK IN THE MUD IF YOUR AIM IS TO SUCCEED AT BOGGIN'
Jingle Davis
October 15, 1979
In Alabama, Florida, Georgia and a growing number of other Southern states, thousands of people get together on Sunday afternoons to drive pickup trucks, Jeeps and other high-priced vehicles through mudholes big enough to hold a few hundred hogs.
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October 15, 1979

You Can't Be A Stick In The Mud If Your Aim Is To Succeed At Boggin'

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Even without a rule book, boggin' is done in almost identical fashion on all tracks. The contestants' aim is to get as far down the track as possible in the shortest time. Tracks differ in difficulty, and many a $15,000 vehicle has wound up mired to its door handles, far short of the finish line. That's when a barefoot teenager slogs out with a cable rigged to a bulldozer or a Franklin logger, which hauls the stuck truck out.

Boggin' is good fun, if not exactly clean. It isn't uncommon to see four generations of a family at the track, adults sitting on lawn chairs sipping drinks while the kids run along the sidelines having wonderful mud battles. And boggin' is probably one of the safest vehicular sports. Aside from the danger of an overstressed engine exploding, not much can happen in a big mudhole.

One final note. At many tracks, after the drivers have had a crack at the mud in their trucks, it is traditional for contestants and spectators to jump in for a slow-motion footrace. Anybody who has to ask why people would do a thing like that just hasn't got the soul of a bogger.

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