SI Vault
 
Lost & Found
Ben Reiter
July 03, 2006
NOT EVERY RETIRED JOCK IS PLAYING GOLF. THESE FORMER STARS ARE HARD AT WORK IN NEW CAREERS OR CHASING THEIR DREAMS. ONE EVEN WENT HOLLYWOOD
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
July 03, 2006

Lost & Found

NOT EVERY RETIRED JOCK IS PLAYING GOLF. THESE FORMER STARS ARE HARD AT WORK IN NEW CAREERS OR CHASING THEIR DREAMS. ONE EVEN WENT HOLLYWOOD

View CoverRead All Articles
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Hollywood HENDERSON

The former wild man struck lottery gold but beat even bigger odds by overcoming his drug habit

FIVE. EIGHT. Seventeen. Thirty-five. Thirty-eight. Forty-one. Those six Texas Lottery numbers in March 2000 netted Thomas ( Hollywood) Henderson $10 million. For the former NFL linebacker, the luck was all in the timing. "[The old] Hollywood would have called a private jet, gotten four or five hookers, six ounces of cocaine and a bunch of champagne and marijuana, and partied for a couple weeks in Vegas," says Henderson, 53. "If I'd won [the lottery] in the 1970s, it would have been tragic."

But Henderson left his Hollywood alter ego in a dingy Long Beach, Calif., jail cell in November 1983, after he'd been arrested for sexual assault during a drug binge. "I remember standing over a dirty sink, looking in the mirror, thinking, Who are you? What did you do with Thomas?" Henderson says. At that moment Henderson turned his focus to recovering from addiction. While on bond he entered rehab, and in November '84, during a 28-month prison term on the sexual assault conviction, he celebrated a year of sobriety. In '86, a week after his release, Henderson stood before an audience at Virginia Tech to give the first of many lectures about his recovery. He has written two books and produced eight motivational videos. "Most rehabs and prisons in the U.S. have a Thomas Henderson video," he says. "Hundreds of thousands of inmates have benefited from my recovery."

The Austin resident spends much of his time golfing and doting on his two children and two grandkids, but through e-mails and phone calls he still counsels those struggling with addiction. Once a month he meets with patients at a rehab facility in West Palm Beach, Fla. "I tell them that when you [take control over your addiction], you can get past it," he says. "If Thomas Henderson can change his life, anyone can."

The LONGEST GAME

It took 33 innings for the Pawtucket Red Sox to win; in the ensuing 25 years no game has matched it

1981 - 25th Anniversary - 2006

OF WADE BOGGS'S 3,734 hits as a professional ballplayer, his game-tying double for the Triple A Pawtucket ( R.I.) Red Sox in the bottom of the 21st inning in the early hours of April 19, 1981, is the most bittersweet. "Everybody was upset that I prolonged the agony," recalls Boggs, who played third for Boston's top farm team. The Rochester ( N.Y.) Red Wings (a Baltimore Orioles affiliate) had taken a 2--1 lead in the top of the inning, and most of the exhausted and freezing players were ready to pack it in. "I don't know if the temperature was 20 degrees, but it seemed like it was," says Marty Barrett, a second baseman for the PawSox at the time. "We had these big, old oil barrels in the dugout, and we were putting broken bats in there and lighting them on fire for warmth."

It's fortunate that plenty of bats were available that frigid night at Pawtucket's McCoy Stadium, as the players and the crowd (which dwindled from 1,740 to 19) weren't sent home until 4:09 a.m. International League president Harold Cooper finally suspended play after 32 innings--and a total of four "seventh-inning" stretches--with the score still tied at 2.

The game did not resume until the teams met again on June 23, and then it ended after only 18 minutes: In the bottom of the 33rd a bases-loaded single by Pawtucket first baseman Dave Koza scored Barrett, who turned 23 that day. The game set professional baseball records that still stand: innings, at bats (219), pitches (882), strikeouts (60) and time (8:25). It also featured 25 future big leaguers, including shortstop Cal Ripken Jr. of the Red Wings, and Boggs, Barrett, catcher Rich Gedman and pitchers Bruce Hurst and Bobby Ojeda of the PawSox.

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10