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For the Record
Chris Mannix
February 12, 2007
Died Of complications from pneumonia, former All-Star pitcher Steve Barber, 68. In 1963 Barber (above) became the first 20-game winner in Orioles history when he went 20--13 with a 2.75 ERA. Midway through the '67 season, the lefty took part in one of the wildest no-hitters baseball has ever seen. Pitching in Baltimore, he walked 10 Tigers in 8 2/3 hitless innings before he was finally pulled with two men on and the score tied 1--1. Detroit then scored the winning run on an error. (Barber also hit two batters, had one wild pitch and made a throwing error that day.) In his 15-year career with seven teams, Barber was 121--106 and made two All-Star teams.
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February 12, 2007

For The Record

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Died
Of complications from pneumonia, former All-Star pitcher Steve Barber, 68. In 1963 Barber (above) became the first 20-game winner in Orioles history when he went 20--13 with a 2.75 ERA. Midway through the '67 season, the lefty took part in one of the wildest no-hitters baseball has ever seen. Pitching in Baltimore, he walked 10 Tigers in 8 2/3 hitless innings before he was finally pulled with two men on and the score tied 1--1. Detroit then scored the winning run on an error. (Barber also hit two batters, had one wild pitch and made a throwing error that day.) In his 15-year career with seven teams, Barber was 121--106 and made two All-Star teams.

Determined
By the Los Angeles County coroner's office, that USC kicker Mario Danelo was legally intoxicated when he fell to his death last month (Scorecard, Jan. 15). Danelo, 21, was found at the base of a 100-foot cliff on Jan. 6. The coroner's report found that Danelo's blood alcohol level was nearly three times the legal limit—but the report did not ascertain the manner in which he died. Several of Danelo's USC teammates said after his death that they do not believe the kicker took his own life.

Rejected
By the Major League Baseball commissioner's office, the one-year, $15.8-million contract that leftfielder Barry Bonds signed last month with the Giants. The contract, which included a clause allowing the team to terminate the deal should Bonds be indicted, was dismissed because it contained language requiring Bonds to make personal appearances on behalf of the team. Such personal-appearance provisions are banned by baseball. The Giants reworded the contract and sent it back to Bonds but the slugger's agent said, "At this time, Barry is not signing the new documents."

Offered
By two North American sports franchise owners, $880 million to purchase Liverpool of the English Premier League. Tom Hicks, who owns the Texas Rangers and the Dallas Stars, and George Gillett Jr., who is the owner of the Montreal Canadiens, teamed up to bid for England's most successful club. If the sale goes through, Liverpool would be the third Premiership club purchased by Americans in two years. Cleveland Browns owner Randy Lerner bought Aston Villa last summer, and in 2005 Tampa Bay Buccaneers owner Malcolm Glazer took over Manchester United for $1.55 billion.

Questioned
By Miami police as part of an investigation into a shooting death, Bengals wide receiver Chad Johnson (above). The victim—27-year-old Curtis Tavares Dopson, who was shot on Jan. 26 outside the duplex where he lived—was a childhood friend of Johnson's. No arrests have been made, and the Bengals issued a statement saying that "police have characterized this as a routine procedure and have stressed that Chad is not a suspect or even a person of interest in this case."

Passed
The deadline for the Hornets to pick up their option to play next season in Oklahoma City. The decision means that the team will return to play a full 41-game schedule in New Orleans for the first time since 2004--05. The Hornets, who ranked last in the NBA in attendance during their final season in New Orleans, sold out 18 of 36 games in Oklahoma City last season and have sold out seven there so far this year. "We're extremely grateful to the people in Oklahoma City," says Hornets owner George Shinn. "[But] the right thing to do is for us to go back."

Suspended
Indefinitely by the Italian soccer federation, professional games after a policeman was killed in a riot started by fans. (Additionally, a friendly between the Italian national team and Romania scheduled for Wednesday was called off.) Last Friday, supporters of Serie A sides Catania and Palermo clashed outside a stadium in Sicily. Filippo Raciti, a 38-year-old police officer, was killed in the melee. More than 100 people were injured in the violence and nine were arrested. "People have got to understand it's time for a change," said Italian prime minister Romano Prodi.

Requested
By Senator John Kerry, that the FCC investigate a pending deal that would give DirecTV the exclusive right to broadcast out-of-market baseball games. In recent years cable subscribers could purchase MLB's Extra Innings package, which includes dozens of games each week. But MLB's agreement with DirecTV would mean that fans would have to purchase a satellite dish to get the games. Approximately 15 million people in the U.S. have DirecTV; 75 million have cable. (SI is a unit of Time Warner, which also has a cable television division.) In a letter to FCC chairman Kevin Martin, Kerry, an avid Boston fan, wrote, " Red Sox Nation stretches all across our country from coast to coast. I am concerned that this deal, and others that may follow, will separate fans from their favorite teams and reduce competition in the sports market."

Suspended
For two games without pay by the NBA last week for drunk driving, Eric Musselman. The first-year Kings coach pleaded no contest to a charge of driving under the influence and received a $580 fine. Musselman (left) was pulled over on Oct. 21 following a 112--96 win over the Jazz in an exhibition game. "I made a mistake and take full responsibility," Musselman said. "Hopefully, this will provide closure on the matter."

Died
At age 90, Bing Devine, who as G.M. of the St. Louis Cardinals pulled off one of the most lopsided trades in baseball history. In 1964 he swapped sore-armed pitcher Ernie Broglio for Cubs outfielder Lou Brock, who went on to a Hall of Fame career in St. Louis. Devine served two stints as the Redbirds' G.M., from 1958 to '64 and from '68 to '78. His teams won two NL pennants and one World Series.

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