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For the Record
May 07, 2007
Born To junior Syracuse forward Fantasia Goodwin, a baby girl last Thursday—two months after Goodwin last played for the Orange. Goodwin (below), the team's third-leading scorer last season, revealed last week that on Feb. 25, the day before Syracuse's final game, she told coach Quentin Hillsman that she had been hiding her pregnancy all season. (Hillsman told her to skip the game and see a doctor.) "[The baby] is healthy; I'm healthy," Goodwin, 21, told the Syracuse Daily Orange. "I plan on returning ... in the fall to continue my senior year and play basketball."
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May 07, 2007

For The Record

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Born
To junior Syracuse forward Fantasia Goodwin, a baby girl last Thursday—two months after Goodwin last played for the Orange. Goodwin (below), the team's third-leading scorer last season, revealed last week that on Feb. 25, the day before Syracuse's final game, she told coach Quentin Hillsman that she had been hiding her pregnancy all season. (Hillsman told her to skip the game and see a doctor.) "[The baby] is healthy; I'm healthy," Goodwin, 21, told the Syracuse Daily Orange. "I plan on returning ... in the fall to continue my senior year and play basketball."

Pleaded
Guilty, to distributing steroids to dozens of current and former major leaguers, onetime Mets clubhouse attendant Kirk Radomski. The 37-year-old Radomski, a Manorville, N.Y., native who was employed by the team from 1985 through '95, told federal investigators that he provided steroids, human growth hormone and other performance-enhancing drugs to players between '95 and 2005. (The names of players Radomski sold to were blacked out on a search warrant affidavit obtained by SI.) Prosecutors say Radomski was a major source of banned drugs for big leaguers after BALCO was shut down in '03. He faces up to 25 years in prison, and as a condition of his plea will cooperate with the federal steroids probe and baseball's internal investigation headed by former U.S. senator George Mitchell.

Fined
$10,000 by NASCAR and placed on probation for the rest of the year, driver Juan Pablo Montoya, for making an obscene gesture on live television. Montoya flipped the bird at a camera while sitting in his car during practice on April 19 at Phoenix International Raceway. He said he did not know that the camera was providing a live feed for the Speed Channel. "I feel really bad that the incident happened," Montoya said. "I completely understand NASCAR's point of view and their decision."

Won
By Duke, the ACC men's lacrosse championship. On Sunday the Blue Devils, who had most of their 2006 season canceled after three players were accused of rape by a dancer hired to perform at a team party, defeated Virginia in the tournament final, giving the school its first ACC lacrosse title since '02. (Charges against the accused players were dropped last month.) "We talked about leaving a legacy here," said senior Matt Danowski (below), who scored three goals in the final. "It's another testament to the character of the guys on this team and the way we've stuck [together] throughout this whole thing."

Rejected
By CBS, a commercial for Maxfli balls in which John Daly drinks a beer while driving a golf cart. In the ad Daly, who has been treated for alcohol abuse in the past, is also seen singing in a crowded bar. "Any implied or direct reference to excessive consumption of alcohol would not meet network guidelines," said a CBS spokesperson. (The spot has appeared several times on Golf Channel.) The New York Times reported that Daly was drinking ginger ale when the commercial was filmed. "We looked at John Daly as someone who lights up a room," Bob Maggiore, senior director of marketing for TaylorMade- Adidas, which makes Maxfli balls, told the paper, "not someone with a troubled past."

Resigned
A month after taking Boston College to its first women's Frozen Four, coach Tom Mutch. BC said Mutch quit after the school began looking into allegations of inappropriate conduct with his players. Last week the Boston Herald, citing an anonymous source, reported that Mutch, 39, had received sexually explicit text messages from forward Kelli Stack, a freshman who scored a team-high 54 points last season. Mutch, who had coached the Eagles since 2003, was named Hockey East coach of the year in March. He did not respond to SI's requests for comment.

Filed
By Stuard Baldonado, one of the Duquesne basketball players shot at an on-campus dance last September, a lawsuit alleging that the university failed to adequately protect its students. A junior forward who was academically ineligible last season, Baldonado was wounded in the arm and chest when a gunman who was not a student opened fire. (Four other players were injured as well.) In the suit Baldonado claims that a doorman let two men with guns into the dance without frisking them. Baldonado, who plans to play this season, is seeking unspecified damages for physical and emotional suffering. Duquesne would not comment on the lawsuit.

Died
At age 61, of a heart attack, Alan Ball, who helped England win its only World Cup, in 1966. The 21-year-old Ball (left), the youngest player on the team, assisted on the go-ahead goal in England's 4--2 win over West Germany in the final, a play that instantly made him a national hero. "He was probably the best player that day," former teammate Bobby Charlton told the BBC last week. Ball was later captain of the national team—he scored eight goals in 72 international appearances—and he played professionally in the English First Division and the NASL for 22 years.

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