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NATIONAL SPELLING BEE
June 11, 2007
After winning the Scripps National Spelling Bee last Thursday, Evan-O'Dorney (above, 11) didn't break into an oberek (the word for a joyous Polish folk dance, which derailed a rival in the finals). Instead the 13-year-old eighth-grader from Danville, Calif., hugged his mom, raised his trophy for the spell-parazzi and revealed that he actually sees himself as more of a math guy. O'Dorney survived 13 tense rounds on Thursday while a TV audience of more than 5.7 million beheld the tears, yelps and facial contortions that speak of intense competition and have led many to see spelling as a sport, no matter what the zoiluses say. (O'Dorney nailed zoilus, which means critic, in Round 10.) O'Dorney, who won the competition by correctly spelling serrefine (a small forceps), received $42,500 in cash and scholarship money.
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June 11, 2007

National Spelling Bee

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After winning the Scripps National Spelling Bee last Thursday, Evan-O'Dorney (above, 11) didn't break into an oberek (the word for a joyous Polish folk dance, which derailed a rival in the finals). Instead the 13-year-old eighth-grader from Danville, Calif., hugged his mom, raised his trophy for the spell-parazzi and revealed that he actually sees himself as more of a math guy. O'Dorney survived 13 tense rounds on Thursday while a TV audience of more than 5.7 million beheld the tears, yelps and facial contortions that speak of intense competition and have led many to see spelling as a sport, no matter what the zoiluses say. (O'Dorney nailed zoilus, which means critic, in Round 10.) O'Dorney, who won the competition by correctly spelling serrefine (a small forceps), received $42,500 in cash and scholarship money.

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