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SCOOTER McCRAY
Julia Morrill
July 11, 2005
The former Louisville bruiser is now in the business of comfort
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July 11, 2005

Scooter Mccray

The former Louisville bruiser is now in the business of comfort

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IN 1980 the Louisville Cardinals used a full-court pressure defense, an up-tempo offensive attack and dazzling athleticism to overwhelm opponents en route to the NCAA championship. Senior guard Darrell Griffith, a.k.a. Dr. Dunkenstein, scored 23 points, and freshman forward Rodney McCray had 11 rebounds as the Doctors of Dunk beat UCLA 59-54 in the title game. "The team was very talented and close-knit," says sophomore forward Scooter McCray, Rodney's brother, who had to redshirt the season after tearing the meniscus in his right knee. "When you reach the pinnacle, and all the world is watching, it's a reality you wish you could share with everyone."

After three more seasons at Louisville, McCray graduated and played three years in the NBA and one in France. Then he returned to his alma mater as an assistant coach, working with Denny Crum for 10 seasons before he was reassigned within the athletic department after he was found to have violated NCAA rules. (Using his own credit card, McCray secured a discounted hotel room for the father of Cardinals forward Nate Johnson.) When he couldn't get another job, "I decided to close that chapter," he says of his coaching career.

Now McCray is a part-owner of three La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries in the Louisville area. He lives in Prospect, Ky., with his wife, Terryl, and their eight-year-old son, Malyiek. Their daughter, Tarryn, 17, was part of her own national championship team in high school for cheerleading and will be a freshman at Louisville this fall. Several of his former teammates are loyal customers, and Crum once bought five recliners and two sofas for a home theater he was adding to his house. "With the exception of Coach," McCray jokes, "they're all looking for discounts." -- Julia Morrill

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