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SETH DAVIS'S Hoop Thoughts
SETH DAVIS
February 20, 2006
MIZZOU STARTS OVER Missouri was the subject of a lengthy NCAA investigation and endured a slew of other off-court embarrassments during Quin Snyder's seven-year tenure in Columbia, but it wasn't until the Tigers started losing badly--the team is likely to miss the NCAA tournament for the third straight year--that the school decided to make a change. The final straw was an embarrassing 26-point loss at Baylor on Feb. 7 that left Missouri at 10-11. (At week's end it had improved to 11-11 overall, 4-7 in the Big 12.) Three days later officials told Snyder (above) he was out at the end of the season, prompting him to quit. Now Mizzou has a chance to get things right with Snyder's replacement. The Tigers have been on NCAA probation under both Snyder and his predecessor, Norm Stewart. If university administrators do not establish a new attitude in the program, then it's only a matter of time before Missouri makes headlines again for the wrong reasons.
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February 20, 2006

Seth Davis's Hoop Thoughts

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MIZZOU STARTS OVER
Missouri was the subject of a lengthy NCAA investigation and endured a slew of other off-court embarrassments during Quin Snyder's seven-year tenure in Columbia, but it wasn't until the Tigers started losing badly--the team is likely to miss the NCAA tournament for the third straight year--that the school decided to make a change. The final straw was an embarrassing 26-point loss at Baylor on Feb. 7 that left Missouri at 10-11. (At week's end it had improved to 11-11 overall, 4-7 in the Big 12.) Three days later officials told Snyder (above) he was out at the end of the season, prompting him to quit. Now Mizzou has a chance to get things right with Snyder's replacement. The Tigers have been on NCAA probation under both Snyder and his predecessor, Norm Stewart. If university administrators do not establish a new attitude in the program, then it's only a matter of time before Missouri makes headlines again for the wrong reasons.

GIVE CALHOUN A BREAK
Connecticut coach Jim Calhoun certainly has done some things this season that are worthy of criticism, but the skewering he has received recently over his treatment of UConn's beat writers is far from deserved. The minirevolt on press row was ignited by Jeff Jacobs of The Hartford Courant, who complained in a Jan. 31 column that Calhoun had threatened him a month earlier in response to an item in a previous Jacobs column. ( Calhoun had told reporters that if Jacobs attended practice, he'd better come "with a couple of armed guards.") To engage in personal sniping in the pages of a newspaper is plain silly. Furthermore, the readers don't care. If Jacobs or any other reporter doesn't like the way Calhoun treats him, he should handle it face-to-face and behind closed doors.

THREE-POINTER
1 Michigan has major defensive problems. The Wolverines (16-6) let Ohio State and Purdue shoot a combined 61.1% (55.3% from three-point range) in their two losses last week, and Michigan has fallen out of the Top 25 with three straight defeats.

2 This is the best national scoring race ever. Gonzaga's Adam Morrison (above) and Duke's J.J. Redick are not only the top two candidates for player of the year honors, but through Monday only two points separated them in the scoring battle, with Morrison (28.8 per game) first and Redick (28.7) right behind him.

3 The Big East is in good shape to get nine NCAA tournament bids. That's how many of its teams are ranked in the top 35 of the RPI, and with so many other power conferences having down years, it looks as if all nine could get into the tournament.

For more Hoop Thoughts from Seth Davis go to SI.com/collegebasketball.

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