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For the Record
March 13, 2006
Won By speedskater Chad Hedrick, the 1,500-meter World Cup title. Hedrick edged U.S. teammate Shani Davis, with whom he openly feuded in Turin, in the final race on Sunday to wrap up the season championship. Skating in the penultimate pair in Heerenveen, the Nethlerlands, Davis--who won silver in the event at the Olympics--took the lead with a time of 1:46.11. But Olympic bronze medalist Hedrick, skating last, topped him by .63 of a second; it was the third time in five races this season the pair finished one-two. (Hedrick won twice, Davis once.) Hedrick also won the World Cup 5,000-meter title last Friday, and Davis won the 1,000-meter title on Saturday.
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March 13, 2006

For The Record

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Won
By speedskater Chad Hedrick, the 1,500-meter World Cup title. Hedrick edged U.S. teammate Shani Davis, with whom he openly feuded in Turin, in the final race on Sunday to wrap up the season championship. Skating in the penultimate pair in Heerenveen, the Nethlerlands, Davis--who won silver in the event at the Olympics--took the lead with a time of 1:46.11. But Olympic bronze medalist Hedrick, skating last, topped him by .63 of a second; it was the third time in five races this season the pair finished one-two. ( Hedrick won twice, Davis once.) Hedrick also won the World Cup 5,000-meter title last Friday, and Davis won the 1,000-meter title on Saturday.

Evacuated
From a Loews theater complex in Homestead, Pa., members of the Steelers, because of a bomb threat. The team was in the middle of a private screening of a DVD commemorating its Super Bowl victory when an anonymous caller told a 911 operator that a bomb was about to go off in a Loews theater. Police ushered the players--including Ben Roethlisberger, Jerome Bettis and Super Bowl MVP Hines Ward--and 1,000 other moviegoers out of the cineplex. A bomb-sniffing dog turned up no evidence of explosives. The Steelers' event has not been rescheduled.

Docked
By the NCAA, athletic scholarships at 65 schools that failed to meet the standards of academic progress. The NCAA uses a points system to track the number of student-athletes who meet minimum requirements; schools below a cutoff figure risk being penalized. Ninety-nine men's and women's teams will lose scholarships beginning next fall. Less than 2% of NCAA teams were sanctioned, compared with 6% last year. Said NCAA president Myles Brand, "We want people to know that if you're going to play our games, you're going to be a student."

Sued
By English soccer star Ashley Cole, two London tabloids that he claims linked him to a homosexual "orgy." Cole, who plays fullback for Arsenal and the English national team, was not named by either The Sun or News of the World. But the 25-year-old, who is engaged to pop singer Cheryl Tweedy, is suing on the grounds that his identity could still be inferred. "The newspapers knew there was no basis to name Ashley but arranged the articles and pictures in such a way that readers would identify him," Cole's lawyer, Graham Shear, said. "There is no truth whatever in these allegations."

Retired
After 14 seasons, former All-Star second baseman Bret Boone (above), who was trying to win a job with the Mets. The four-time Gold Glove winner finished third in the AL MVP voting in 2001, and as recently as '03, when he hit 35 home runs and drove in 117 runs for the Mariners, Boone, 36, was one of the game's most feared hitters. But his performance plummeted. After he batted .231 in 74 games, the Mariners traded him to the Twins last July; Minnesota released him after 14 games. ( Boone was also targeted last year as a possible steroid user in Jose Canseco's book Juiced, a charge Boone called "absolutely ridiculous.") "I had lost the edge," Boone said last week. "I couldn't look in the mirror and think that I would get [it] back."

Implemented
By the U.S. Open, an instant-replay system for reviewing disputed calls. Both the ATP and the WTA Tours will begin using the system at the Nasdaq-100 in Key Biscayne, Fla., later this month, but the Open will be the only Grand Slam event to use it this year. (Because of the cost, it will only be used on the stadium court at the Nasdaq-100 and on the two show courts at the Open.) Players will receive two challenges per set, and the replay will be shown on a screen visible to the umpire, players and crowd. The umpire's review is expected to take less than 10 seconds. "In my 20 years in professional tennis, this is one of the most exciting things to happen for players, fans and television viewers," said Andre Agassi.

Sold
At the Fasig-Tipton sale in Miami, an unnamed 2-year-old colt (right) for $16 million, a record for a thoroughbred at auction. (The previous record for a thoroughbred was $13.1 million for Seattle Dancer in 1985; the record for a 2-year-old was $5.2 million for the still-unraced Ever Shifting.) The colt was bought by the Irish-based Coolmore Stud breeding outfit. Bidding was driven up by the 2-year-old's impressive bloodlines (he was the second foal out of Magical Masquerade by Forestry, one of the sport's preeminent sires) and the fact that he recently breezed a furlong in a very fast 9.8 seconds. Demi O'Byrne, the agent acting for Coolmore, said, "He'd better be good."

Chosen
As the nickname of the new Houston MLS franchise, the Dynamo. The team, which has played in San Jose for the past 10 years, was originally going to be called Houston 1836, in honor of the year in which the city was founded. But that is also the year in which Texas seceded from Mexico and of the Mexican army's defeat by Sam Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto, so the name was dropped after objections from the Mexican-American community.

Died
At age 57, former Indiana women's basketball coach Jim Izard. According to the Pensacola ( Fla.) medical examiner's office, Izard committed suicide at his home on Feb. 28. Izard, the winningest women's coach in Hoosiers history, won 188 games from 1989 through 2000, when he was fired. He then sued the school for sex and age discrimination after it hired Kathi Bennett, who was given a five-year contract worth $110,000 in the first year. Izard had worked on a year-to-year basis and made $76,775 his final year. In 2002 the school paid him $76,775 to settle the suit.

Opened
By the Army, a criminal investigation into the death of Army Ranger and former Arizona Cardinals safety Pat Tillman (above), who was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan in 2004. The death was first blamed on enemy fire, but the Army later acknowledged that there was no attack. There have been four military probes, and last week the Defense Department echoed what Tillman's family has argued: They were incomplete. (The criminal case may explore whether some in Tillman's unit acted recklessly.) Said Tillman's mother, Mary, to The Washington Post, "It is completely obvious that this should have been done from the very beginning."

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