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For the Record
May 01, 2006
Won By Wladimir Klitschko, with a display of firepower that left Chris Byrd overwhelmed, the IBF heavyweight championship. Klitschko (above, right) stopped Byrd in the seventh round of their fight in Berlin last Saturday to take the belt Byrd won in 2002. The KO sent a message to critics of Klitschko, whose TKO losses to Corrie Sanders in 2003 and Lamon Brewster in '04 left many questioning his heart. Against Byrd he was ferocious, flooring the champ in the fifth with a straight right and finishing him off with a right hook. "He should be proud," Klitschko said. "I have never seen anybody take that much punishment and come back."
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May 01, 2006

For The Record

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Won
By Wladimir Klitschko, with a display of firepower that left Chris Byrd overwhelmed, the IBF heavyweight championship. Klitschko (above, right) stopped Byrd in the seventh round of their fight in Berlin last Saturday to take the belt Byrd won in 2002. The KO sent a message to critics of Klitschko, whose TKO losses to Corrie Sanders in 2003 and Lamon Brewster in '04 left many questioning his heart. Against Byrd he was ferocious, flooring the champ in the fifth with a straight right and finishing him off with a right hook. "He should be proud," Klitschko said. "I have never seen anybody take that much punishment and come back."

Won
By Deena Kastor of Mammoth Lakes, Calif., the London Marathon. Kastor finished in 2:19:35--making her just the eighth woman to break the 2:20 barrier. (She lowered her own American marathon record by 1:41.) Kastor, 33, won by nearly two minutes; the only question was whether or not she'd beat 2:20. "I knew the last 10K would be successful," she said. "I kept doing the math. I kept looking at my watch at every mark and making sure I was going to get under it."

Cleared
Of the most serious charges in the first of the Minnesota Vikings' "love boat" trials, Moe Williams. A jury found the running back, 31, guilty of a misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct stemming from a team cruise last October but acquitted him of charges of indecent conduct and lewd and lascivious conduct. ( Williams, who is no longer with the team, was accused of fondling a topless dancer.) He was fined $300 and ordered to perform 30 hours of community service. The trials of two other players, Fred Smoot and Bryant McKinnie, are scheduled for later this month.

Suggested
On air that women have no place in the dugout, Mets broadcaster Keith Hernandez. The former Mets and Cardinals first baseman, who has enjoyed a reputation as a ladies' man, made the remarks during last Saturday's game at San Diego after Mike Piazza high-fived the team's 33-year-old massage therapist, Kelly Calabrese, in the Padres' dugout. "You have got to be kidding me," Hernandez said while covering the game for SportsNet New York. "Only player personnel in the dugout." When he found out she was on the team's staff, Hernandez said, "I won't say that women belong in the kitchen, but they don't belong in the dugout." Hernandez, 52, quickly laughed and apologized, saying, "You know I am only teasing. I love you gals out there--always have." (He repeated his apology on the next day's broadcast.) Calabrese wasn't amused. "It is amazing that somebody can be that ignorant to actually voice that opinion," she said after the game.

Upset
By a U.S. Fed Cup team devoid of its stars, the heavily favored Germans. With Serena and Venus Williams, Lindsay Davenport and Jennifer Capriati unavailable, Fed Cup captain Zina Garrison summoned little-known No. 39 Jill Craybas and lesser-known No. 75 Jamea Jackson (above) for last week's quarterfinal match in Germany. Though neither American had previously won a Fed Cup match, they led the U.S. to a 3--2 victory. Jackson, 19, won the decisive rubber against Martina Mueller on Sunday. "I struggled a bit in the middle of the first set, but I kept my head," said Jackson.

Euthanized
After being stricken by an undetermined illness, 3-year-old thoroughbred With a City. The horse, who won the $500,000 Lane's End at Turfway Park on March 25, was expected to compete in the Kentucky Derby on May 6, but last Thursday he became ill. He was taken to the Hagyard Equine Medical Institute in Lexington, Ky., on Friday, but doctors could not discover what was wrong with him. "They just don't know," said Mike Maker, the horse's trainer. "Hopefully, a necropsy will tell us more, but their feeling right now is that they're not so sure that they're going to be able to tell."

Clipped
At the behest of White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf, the shaggy mane of catcher A.J. Pierzynski (below, before and after). Third baseman Joe Crede was also told to cut his long hair, which he grew out last year during a hot streak at the plate. "Rules are rules," said Crede. "I'm going to have to find a new superstition." Both players had their locks shorn last Thursday in the studio of Chicago radio station WSCR-AM, which broadcast the haircuts.

Died
Of injuries suffered in a car accident, Oscar Acosta, 49, the manager of the Yankees' Rookie League team and a former major league pitching coach. Acosta and Humberto Trejo, 38, New York's field coordinator in the Dominican Republic, were in a car that was struck by an SUV near Santo Domingo on April 19. Trejo was also killed. (The driver of the SUV suffered minor injuries.) They were in the Dominican Republic scouting players. Acosta served as the pitching coach for the Cubs (2000 and '01) and Rangers (2002) and spent 16 years in the Yankees' system.

Died
At age 85, College Football Hall of Famer Bob Dove. A defensive end at Notre Dame, Dove won the Rockne Trophy as the nation's best lineman in 1942. After a stint in the Marines, Dove spent eight seasons in the NFL, playing on the Lions' championship teams in 1953 and '54. After he retired he was an NFL and college assistant coach for more than 30 years.

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