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Game Watch
Adam Duerson
July 02, 2007
IT WASN'T exactly Bjorn Borg shrieking at the sky after winning Wimbledon, but there was a certain drama to Russ Yagoda's celebration at the Brooklyn tavern Barcade last Saturday. The 23-year-old advertising account executive fell to his knees on a patch of AstroTurf, exultant at having won the first Wiimbledon championship. That's no typo—Yagoda was competing in Wii Tennis, which is played on the popular Nintendo video-game console with motion sensor controllers that players swing like a real racket. Wii Tennis, said one Wiimbledon watcher, "brings out the jock in the geek and the geek in the jock."
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July 02, 2007

Game Watch

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IT WASN'T exactly Bjorn Borg shrieking at the sky after winning Wimbledon, but there was a certain drama to Russ Yagoda's celebration at the Brooklyn tavern Barcade last Saturday. The 23-year-old advertising account executive fell to his knees on a patch of AstroTurf, exultant at having won the first Wiimbledon championship. That's no typo—Yagoda was competing in Wii Tennis, which is played on the popular Nintendo video-game console with motion sensor controllers that players swing like a real racket. Wii Tennis, said one Wiimbledon watcher, "brings out the jock in the geek and the geek in the jock."

Wiimbledon was the brainchild of New York City Wii enthusiasts Lane Buschel and Steve Bryant. Around 600 people volunteered to play, but space constraints limited the field to 128 players—many of whom showed up in costumes (there was a Harry Potter lookalike and a couple Super Mario Bros. characters). "I feel like a champion," said Yagoda (right), who won a Wii console. "Somebody asked me if I'd rather win Wiimbledon or Wimbledon. I said, 'What's Wimbledon?'"

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