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Sweet Success
Tim Layden
September 03, 2007
Lauryn Williams was a surprise Olympic silver medalist in the 100 meters in 2004 and a surprise world champion in 2005 after finishing third at that year's nationals. She arrived in Osaka having spent more than a year struggling with a left hamstring injury; 11 U.S. women had run faster than she had this year. So what happened? Williams won a silver medal on Monday night, narrowly missing gold behind Jamaica's Veronica Campbell. Williams's career is defined by major-race performances. "There's something about the big events," said Williams afterward. "It's do or die, and I did." Kara Goucher did too, winning an unlikely bronze last Saturday night in the 10,000, just the fifth world or Olympic medal in U.S. history for a woman in a race 10K or longer. The victory was poignant as well. Goucher (above) and her husband, Adam, are coached by marathon legend Alberto Salazar, 49, who suffered a massive heart attack on June 30. (He is now doing fine.) "My life has changed since Alberto's [attack]," says Kara. "Adam and I have taken a different perspective on life.... Even though we've been training really hard, it's just running."
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September 03, 2007

Sweet Success

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Lauryn Williams was a surprise Olympic silver medalist in the 100 meters in 2004 and a surprise world champion in 2005 after finishing third at that year's nationals. She arrived in Osaka having spent more than a year struggling with a left hamstring injury; 11 U.S. women had run faster than she had this year. So what happened? Williams won a silver medal on Monday night, narrowly missing gold behind Jamaica's Veronica Campbell. Williams's career is defined by major-race performances. "There's something about the big events," said Williams afterward. "It's do or die, and I did." Kara Goucher did too, winning an unlikely bronze last Saturday night in the 10,000, just the fifth world or Olympic medal in U.S. history for a woman in a race 10K or longer. The victory was poignant as well. Goucher (above) and her husband, Adam, are coached by marathon legend Alberto Salazar, 49, who suffered a massive heart attack on June 30. (He is now doing fine.) "My life has changed since Alberto's [attack]," says Kara. "Adam and I have taken a different perspective on life.... Even though we've been training really hard, it's just running."

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