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The Pepper Mill by Dottie Pepper
Alan Shipnuck
September 03, 2007
Having covered the U.S. Women's Amateur and the men's Amateur over the last three weeks, I've had a front-row seat to all that's right about golf: playing hard for nothing more than an invitation to the Masters (men) or the Kraft Nabisco (women), and a free pass to your respective U.S. Open. Instead of gallery ropes there are local caddies (or you can carry your own bag) and quirky matchups. This year Cheng Tsung Pan, a 15-year-old from Taiwan who made it to the quarterfinals, could've faced George Zahringer, a man in his mid-50s, or college stud Colt Knost (above), who went on to beat Alabama's Michael Thompson 2 and 1 in the final. On the women's side, UCLA freshman Maria Uribe, a world-class salsa dancer from Colombia, boogied past Duke's two-time college player of the year Amanda Blumenherst 1 up in the final. You can't invent stories like this in the marketing department.
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September 03, 2007

The Pepper Mill By Dottie Pepper

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Having covered the U.S. Women's Amateur and the men's Amateur over the last three weeks, I've had a front-row seat to all that's right about golf: playing hard for nothing more than an invitation to the Masters (men) or the Kraft Nabisco (women), and a free pass to your respective U.S. Open. Instead of gallery ropes there are local caddies (or you can carry your own bag) and quirky matchups. This year Cheng Tsung Pan, a 15-year-old from Taiwan who made it to the quarterfinals, could've faced George Zahringer, a man in his mid-50s, or college stud Colt Knost (above), who went on to beat Alabama's Michael Thompson 2 and 1 in the final. On the women's side, UCLA freshman Maria Uribe, a world-class salsa dancer from Colombia, boogied past Duke's two-time college player of the year Amanda Blumenherst 1 up in the final. You can't invent stories like this in the marketing department.

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