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In This Sport, Blood Will Tell
Austin Murphy
October 11, 2004
Tyler hamilton has been known to grind the caps off his teeth during bike races, so intent is he on pedaling through the pain. He raced for three weeks in the 2003 Tour de France with a cracked collarbone and came in fourth. In August he won the time trial at the Athens Olympics, endearing himself to millions that day by riding with the tags of his recently deceased dog, Tugboat, tucked in his helmet.
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October 11, 2004

In This Sport, Blood Will Tell

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Grewal raced professionally for nine years. On one of his teams, he says, "it was customary, every morning and every evening, for the soigneur to hand out prepared syringes." Grewal refused to inject himself--again, not because his ethics were offended. "We had no idea what was in them," he says. "If I'd had more information, maybe I'd have made a different decision."

Grewal admits having experimented with ephedrine, a banned stimulant, for races at which he knew he wouldn't be tested. "That was as hard as I got," he says. Grewal says he wasn't the only rider in the peloton using illicit substances and makes no apologies for taking them. "I didn't feel guilty then, and I don't now."

So while he applauds its increasingly effective testing, Grewal has doubts that his old sport can be cleaned up. "The testing is always going to be behind the people on the cutting edge. [The willingness to try anything to win] is human nature."

"I'm not a fatalist," he says. "I'm a realist."

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