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For the Record
October 23, 2006
Issued By the FAA, an order that small, fixed-wing planes not fly through the East River corridor between the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Queens, after Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle was killed when his single-engine plane crashed into a high-rise apartment on Oct. 11. Lidle, 34, and his flight instructor, Tyler Stanger, 26, were flying over the river and banking toward Manhattan when the aircraft struck the 30th floor of the building. (Stanger was also killed.) As of Monday investigators weren't sure what caused the crash or whether Lidle or Stanger was flying the plane. Lidle, who was remembered during the ALCS (left), took up flying less than a year ago but spoke often about how it was an escape from the stress of being a major leaguer.
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October 23, 2006

For The Record

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Issued
By the FAA, an order that small, fixed-wing planes not fly through the East River corridor between the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Queens, after Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle was killed when his single-engine plane crashed into a high-rise apartment on Oct. 11. Lidle, 34, and his flight instructor, Tyler Stanger, 26, were flying over the river and banking toward Manhattan when the aircraft struck the 30th floor of the building. (Stanger was also killed.) As of Monday investigators weren't sure what caused the crash or whether Lidle or Stanger was flying the plane. Lidle, who was remembered during the ALCS (left), took up flying less than a year ago but spoke often about how it was an escape from the stress of being a major leaguer.

Reported
By doctors at the Baltimore VA Medical Center, that emergency-room visits from men decline by 30% during broadcasts of sporting events. (The researchers looked at 796 pro and college football, basketball and baseball games between 2000 and '03.) In the four hours after the events the number of men in the ER went up 40%. David Jerrard, the doctor who led the study, says an acquaintance of his died recently when he put off calling 911 during a Georgia Tech football game. "By the time he capitulated to having 911 called, he was in cardiac arrest," says Jerrard, who hopes that men will "reconsider not watching that two-minute drive and go to the hospital."

Missed
By Colts quarterback Peyton Manning, a regular-season practice--for the first time in his nine-year career. The two-time league MVP missed a workout on Oct. 11 while attending a funeral for his 86-year-old grandmother in Mississippi. "It's always odd when you don't see the guy who's been here for so long," said center Jeff Saturday.

Played
His final tournament, Arnold Palmer (above), who announced after the Champions Tour Administaff Small Business Classic that he won't enter any more events. The Classic, in Spring, Texas, was only the second event this year for Palmer, and it did not go well. Palmer, 77, hit two balls into the water on the 4th hole last Friday, then withdrew because of a sore lower back. (He still finished his round without keeping score because, he said, he owed it to his fans.) "The people, they all want to see a good shot, and you know it and you can't give them that good shot," said Palmer, who played his final PGA Tour event in 2004. "That's when it's time."

Sentenced
To one to six years in prison, Mark Downs Jr., the Pennsylvania T-ball coach who was convicted of paying an eight-year-old to hit an autistic teammate with a ball to keep him out of a playoff game (SI, Aug. 8, 2005). Downs was found guilty of conspiracy to commit simple assault and corruption of minors. Judge Ralph C. Warman called Downs's actions "outrageous" and "extremely reprehensible." As he was led from the courtroom, Downs maintained his innocence, saying, "I didn't do nothing."

Posted
By Tour de France winner Floyd Landis, documents on his website refuting the doping charges against him. Following his Tour win, Landis (below) tested positive for synthetic testosterone. The postings (on floydlandis.com) are meant to point out irregularities in the way his sample was handled and will be part of Landis's appeal before an arbitration panel early next year. Landis's lawyer, Howard Jacobs, says that because antidoping officials leaked Landis's test results, it's only fair that the cyclist respond publicly. "To restore as much of Floyd's image as possible, we have to let the public decide," Jacobs says. "This is the first step in that."

Fired
By Fox, baseball analyst Steve Lyons, after he made comments that the network found offensive during the ALCS. Lyons was working with Thom Brennaman and Lou Piniella when Piniella likened the output of Oakland's Marco Scutaro to the luck of finding a wallet. A few minutes later Piniella used the Spanish words en fuego and frio. After saying that Piniella was "hablaing [sic] Espa�ol," Lyons added, "I still can't find my wallet.... I don't understand him, and I don't want to sit too close to him now." Earlier in the playoffs Lyons and Brennaman made fun of a nearly blind Mets fan who was wearing special glasses, and in 2004 Lyons was suspended for making insensitive remarks about then Dodgers outfielder Shawn Green sitting out a game for Yom Kippur. Speaking of his comments to Piniella, Lyons said, "If I offended anybody, I'm truly sorry. But my comment about Lou taking my wallet was a joke and in no way racially motivated."

Charged
With one felony count of recklessness and misdemeanor counts of battery and disorderly conduct, Pacers guard Stephen Jackson. The charges stem from a fight outside an Indianapolis strip club on Oct. 6. Jackson allegedly fired five shots into the air and kicked a man on the ground. Jackson, who claims he was hit by a car during the incident, said he was defending himself and his teammates. "I'm in a situation now where people thought I acted recklessly, when I know I didn't," Jackson said. "Over due time the courts will know that." A judge entered a not guilty plea for Jackson.

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