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For the Record
December 17, 2007
Died Of an apparent heart attack at age 56, poker player Chip Reese (below). Though he was a three-time World Series of Poker winner, Reese was better known for his acumen in high-stakes cash games. (The great Doyle Brunson called him "arguably the greatest poker player who ever lived.") In 1974 he stopped in Vegas on his way to Stanford Law School. He turned $400 into $66,000 and never made it to Stanford. In 1991 he became the youngest player inducted into the Poker Hall of Fame.
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December 17, 2007

For The Record

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Died
Of an apparent heart attack at age 56, poker player Chip Reese (below). Though he was a three-time World Series of Poker winner, Reese was better known for his acumen in high-stakes cash games. (The great Doyle Brunson called him "arguably the greatest poker player who ever lived.") In 1974 he stopped in Vegas on his way to Stanford Law School. He turned $400 into $66,000 and never made it to Stanford. In 1991 he became the youngest player inducted into the Poker Hall of Fame.

Died
At age 45, surfer Peter Davi. The 6'3", 240-pound big-wave man drowned at Ghost Trees, a surf break off the Pebble Beach Golf Links in Monterey, Calif. Davi helped popularize the spot, and he also made a name for himself on Hawaii's North Shore and at the treacherous Mavericks, a spot about 100 miles north of Monterey. "Everybody knew him," surfer Tyler Smith told the San Francisco Chronicle. "He was kind of like the godfather."

Shot
In both elbows in an incident involving Jamaal Tinsley, Joey Qatato, the Indiana Pacers equipment manager. Qatato was with Tinsley in the player's Rolls-Royce outside an Indianapolis hotel around 3:30 a.m. on Sunday when the car came under fire. Earlier, Tinsley had been in an altercation outside a club with several people who police said were giving him a hard time about his expensive cars. Tinsley was not injured in the shooting. Qatato, 48, was treated and released; police are looking for the gunmen.

Suspended
For 15 games each for violating baseball's drug policy, Baltimore outfielder Jay Gibbons (below) and Royals outfielder Jose Guillen. Both were named in media reports as having received human growth hormone and steroids, but neither player failed a drug test. Their punishments coincide with the more lenient penalties in place at the time that their violations are believed to have occurred. Guillen, who signed a three-year, $36 million deal with Kansas City the day the suspension was announced, will file a grievance. Gibbons will not appeal. "I am deeply sorry for the mistakes that I have made," he said. "I have no excuses and bear sole responsibility for my decisions."

Named
As Florida State's "head coach in waiting" by school president T.K. Wetherell, Seminoles offensive coordinator Jimbo Fisher. Wetherell also announced that coach Bobby Bowden will be back for a 33rd year; Bowden said he'd keep his options open after this season. Under his new deal Fisher will reportedly receive a raise that will bring his salary up from $425,000 to $700,000. When Bowden, who has won more games (373) than any Division I coach, decides to step down, his job will go to the 42-year-old. "This gives me some peace," said Fisher. "I'm content to wait for it."

Advanced
To the Division I-AA championship game, Appalachian State. The Mountaineers made waves in September when they upset then No. 5 Michigan. Since then, they have won 11 of 13 games, including a 55--35 win over Richmond in last Friday's semifinal. Their opponent in this Friday's final is Delaware, which got 243 passing yards from QB Joe Flacco (above) against Southern Illinois. That might be a good omen for the Mountaineers. The Blue Hens' helmets are virtually identical to Michigan's iconic headgear.

Agreed
To a one-year contract with the Brewers that will pay him $10 million, reliever Eric Gagne, 31. The 2003 NL Cy Young winner had a 6.75 ERA last season for Boston and was so bad down the stretch he was only used in blowouts in the playoffs The Brewers lost closer Francisco Cordero to free agency, but G.M. Doug Melvin said Gagne wouldn't necessarily inherit the job. "We're just adding depth," he said.

Agreed
To a one-year deal with the Rangers, Milton Bradley, 29. The temperamental outfielder saw his 2007 season end bizarrely. On Sept. 23 he accidentally stepped on the thumb of Padres teammate Mike Cameron, who was only able to play one more game. The next inning, Bradley—who hit 11 homers in just 144 at bats—tore his ACL when Padres manager Bud Black tried to restrain him from arguing with umpire Mike Winters. San Diego wound up missing the playoffs by one game; Winters was suspended for five games for baiting Bradley.

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