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For the Record
December 24, 2007
Carjacked At gunpoint before a home game against the Bobcats last Saturday, Hawks forward Shelden Williams (below). The 24-year-old, who is in his second NBA season, told police that his 2008 Chrysler Aspen was taken from him outside an Atlanta barber shop. Williams gave police the license-plate number of the vehicle one of the carjackers had been driving, and that afternoon two suspects were arrested at a mall in Douglas County, in Georgia; the two men were in Williams's car. Williams played two minutes in a win over Charlotte that night. "I'm just glad he's safe," said Hawks coach Mike Woodson.
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December 24, 2007

For The Record

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Carjacked
At gunpoint before a home game against the Bobcats last Saturday, Hawks forward Shelden Williams (below). The 24-year-old, who is in his second NBA season, told police that his 2008 Chrysler Aspen was taken from him outside an Atlanta barber shop. Williams gave police the license-plate number of the vehicle one of the carjackers had been driving, and that afternoon two suspects were arrested at a mall in Douglas County, in Georgia; the two men were in Williams's car. Williams played two minutes in a win over Charlotte that night. "I'm just glad he's safe," said Hawks coach Mike Woodson.

Won
By Annika Sorenstam, a tournament for the first time in a year. The world's top-ranked player when the year began, Sorenstam suffered several injuries this season and had only six top 10 finishes, her fewest since 1994, when she was an LPGA tour rookie; she sank to No. 3 in the world. On Sunday she came back from a one-stroke final-round deficit to win the Dubai Ladies Masters, the tournament she won in October 2006, before her drought set in. "I am so happy to have finally won again," she said.

Engaged
Less than a year after each was divorced from a longtime spouse, two-time British Open champion Greg Norman and Chris Evert, winner of 18 Grand Slam singles titles. In September, Norman, 52, reached a divorce settlement with his wife of 25 years, Laura Andrassy. Evert, 53, was divorced last December from her husband of 18 years, former Olympic skier Andy Mill. Said Tami Starr, director of Chris Evert Charities in Boca Raton, Fla., "They're both extremely happy they've found each other."

Retired
After one of surfing's most remarkable careers, 41-year-old Mark Occhilupo (below). A pro at age 17 and ranked second the same year, the Australian-born Occhilupo dropped off the tour in '87 and battled depression and weight problems. The 5'9" goofy-footer spent nearly a decade off the competitive circuit before a stunning comeback: He won the world title at age 33 in 1999. Last Friday, surfing at the Billabong Pipeline Masters in Oahu, Occy, as he's called, was eliminated in the third round, then carried along the beach by fellow surfers. "It's been such a good ride ... no regrets," he said.

Died
At age 88 of cancer, Hall of Fame boxing historian Hank Kaplan. By trade Kaplan was a quarantine officer with the Centers for Disease Control in Miami for 30 years, but he devoted his life to cataloging the rich history of the sport he loved. Kaplan wrote several books about boxing and founded World Wide Boxing Digest magazine. He was on the committee that selected members of the International Boxing Hall of Fame, and he was inducted himself in 2006. His personal archives included boxing memorabilia and writing dating to the 1800s.

Died
At age 88 of respiratory failure, Ted Corbitt (below), whom New York City Marathon founder Fred Lebow once called "the father of American distance running." Corbitt began running as a child on his father's cotton farm in South Carolina and ended up competing in 199 marathons or ultramarathons. Corbitt, who helped found the Road Runners Club of America in 1957, was a member of the '52 U.S Olympic team—he finished 44th in the marathon in Helsinki—and in his prime held the U.S. records at several distances, including the marathon and 100 miles. Well into his 80s he worked as a physical therapist and competed in ultramarathons. "The marathon demands patience," he once said. "You must be willing to suffer and keep on suffering."

Died
At age 40 of undisclosed causes, Brian Sean Griffith, a former bodyguard to figure skater Tonya Harding and one of the conspirators behind the attack on her rival Nancy Kerrigan at the 1994 Olympic tryouts. A few days after Kerrigan was clubbed in the leg by an anonymous assailant, Griffith—then known as Shawn Eckhardt; he later changed his name to distance himself from the scandal—admitted that he and Harding's ex-husband, Jeff Gillooly, had hatched the plan to eliminate Kerrigan from the competition. (The actual attacker was Shane Stant.) Griffith served 14 months in prison for racketeering. "Shawn Eckardt died a long time ago," his brother, Mike Skinner, told The Oregonian last week. "There is no other person than Brian Griffith."

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