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Farewell
December 27, 2004
Even as new stars were born in 2004--welcome Michael Phelps, Ben Roethlisberger, Maria Sharapova, Smarty Jones--others went dark. Each of the athletes, coaches and innovators who died left a mark: some great, some small, all indelible
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December 27, 2004

Farewell

Even as new stars were born in 2004--welcome Michael Phelps, Ben Roethlisberger, Maria Sharapova, Smarty Jones--others went dark. Each of the athletes, coaches and innovators who died left a mark: some great, some small, all indelible

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PETE CUTINO
71

Famously demanding, he led Cal's water polo team to eight national titles between '73 and '88. Four times he was NCAA Coach of the Year and the Peter J. Cutino award--water polo's Heisman--was established in '99.

BRUCE EDWARDS
49

He was on Tom Watson's bag for 30 years and worked the 2003 U.S. Open despite advanced ALS. Watson, inspired, shot an opening-round 65. "Even if I die within the year," the caddie said, "I've had a great life."

SID SMITH
78

A crafty scorer (six 20-goal years), the Toronto captain won three Stanley Cups in the '40s and '50s and twice took the Lady Byng Trophy as the NHL's most gentlemanly player. He played in more than 400 straight games.

JIMMY MCLARNIN
96

He wielded a powerful right hand, had a steel jaw and was known as Baby Face. Historian Burt Sugar named the two-time world champ (he retired in 1936) the second-greatest welterweight of all time.

MARCO PANTANI
34

Dubbed Il Pirata for his bandanna and gold earring, the scrawny (5'8", 126 pounds) Italian cyclist won the Tour de France and the Giro d'Italia in 1998, before spiraling into the drug addiction that apparently cost his life

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