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SCORECARD
Edited by Steve Wulf
January 28, 1991
AND THE GAMES WENT ON
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January 28, 1991

Scorecard

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A huge sign on the yet-to-be-completed natatorium read FIDELIDAD. But it was hard to have fidelidad—fidelity—when the last letter on the sign was only half a D. The loop had fallen off.

SWIMMING ON LINE ONE...

Before Cornell's men's and women's swimming teams could board a bus to Princeton last week for a dual swim meet, a blizzard in Ithaca, N.Y., snowed in the Big Red's machine. Rather than postpone the meet, Cornell coach Joe Lucia called the Tigers' coaches, Susan Teeter-Eggert and Rob Orr, and suggested that the schools compete by phone. The teams would swim the events in their respective pools and then compare the results. Simulated telephone meets aren't entirely new, but being a thoroughly modern fellow, Lucia proposed that the results be exchanged by fax. The Princeton coaches agreed to the plan.

The swimmers went for the scheme, too. According to Teeter-Eggert, the coach of Princeton's women's team, one team member even asked if she could fax a picture of her face to Ithaca so she could intimidate her opponent. To create the atmosphere of an actual competition, the Tigers went through all of their pre-meet rituals before the fax race. Orr gave the men's team his usual pep talk, and then his swimmers gathered in the tunnel outside the pool for its traditional group cheer. Meanwhile in Ithaca, some of the Cornell swimmers psyched themselves up by making fun of the Princeton cheer.

For the record books, not to mention the phone bill, the Princeton women dominated by a score of 180.5-106.5, and the Princeton men won by an even bigger margin, 164-71.

They won so easily, in fact, that they could have phoned in the results.

GEORGES ON HIS MIND

Congratulations to Joan and George Foreman of Houston on the birth of their eight-pound, 13-ounce baby boy last week. In keeping with the family tradition, they christened him George. So the 42-year-old, 265-pound heavyweight now has four sons: George II, George III, George IV, and, yes, George V. The ex-champion, who will fight current champ Evander Holyfield for the undisputed crown on April 19, is, of course, George I.

And what name would the Foremans have given the baby had it been (gasp) a girl? "Her first name would have been Judy," said the father, "but her middle name would have been George."

THE RIGHT THING
Alan Wiggins, who helped lead the San Diego Padres into the 1984 World Series, died on Jan. 6 at the age of 32, reportedly of AIDS-related diseases. The only former Padres teammate who bothered to attend Wiggins's funeral in Los Angeles was Steve Garvey.

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