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Soaring Gulls grounded...an heir for the Ice Princess...a Dragon's dream ended
Edited by Michael Jaffe
March 18, 1991
PurchasedBy former University of Texas football coach Darrell Royal, Willie Nelson's 76-acre Pedernales (Texas) Country Club and recording studio. On March 6, the property, estimated by the IRS to be worth at least $600,000, was sold to Royal for $117,350 in a bank auction held to help defray Nelson's $16.7 million tax debt. The IRS is considering redeeming the property for future sale because the purchase price was so low.
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March 18, 1991

Soaring Gulls Grounded...an Heir For The Ice Princess...a Dragon's Dream Ended

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Purchased
By former University of Texas football coach Darrell Royal, Willie Nelson's 76-acre Pedernales ( Texas) Country Club and recording studio. On March 6, the property, estimated by the IRS to be worth at least $600,000, was sold to Royal for $117,350 in a bank auction held to help defray Nelson's $16.7 million tax debt. The IRS is considering redeeming the property for future sale because the purchase price was so low.

Snapped
By the North Carolina men's lacrosse team, top-ranked Syracuse's 28-game winning streak dating back to March 1989, with a 10-3 victory, in Chapel Hill, N.C. The Tar Heels were led by All-America attackman Dennis Goldstein's two goals and three assists. Goldstein, whose brother, Tim, was the '87 national player of the year, at Cornell, spent his pregame hours listening to the Grateful Dead for inspiration.

Filed for Arbitration
Chunichi Dragons first baseman Hiromitsu Ochiai, becoming the first Japanese player to do so. Ochiai, a three-time triple crown winner, asked for 270 million yen ($2 million) a year—a 50% increase over his 1990 salary. Said Ochiai, "Baseball is the business of selling dreams." Eight days after Ochiai filed, Japanese baseball commissioner Ichiro Yoshikuni ruled in favor of the Dragons, who had offered 220 million yen ($1.69 million). "I'm not sure how much dreams cost," said Yoshikuni, "but I think there must be cheaper ones than what he had in mind."

Expecting
Their first child, in early October, former tennis star Chris Evert, 36, and husband Andy Mill, 38. Evert will still serve as NBC's color analyst at this summer's French Open and Wimbledon. Meanwhile, her main concern is overcoming extended bouts of morning sickness. "I've been dieting on saltines and ginger ale because any other food makes me feel queasy," she said from her Aspen home. "At this point, I'm pretty tired of that menu."

Dropped
Intercollegiate athletics, by U.S. International University, in San Diego, in the wake of the school's filing for bankruptcy. U.S. International is best known for the futility of its basketball team, which over the past 12 seasons was 89-240 and lost to Loyola Marymount in the three highest-scoring games in NCAA history. Last month, the Soaring Gulls were forced to finish the season practicing at La Jolla's community center after they were evicted from their "gym," a converted warehouse, when the school couldn't pay the rent.

Died
Joe Dey Jr., 83, who served as the executive director of the U.S. Golf Association (1934-69) and the first commissioner of the PGA ('69-74); of cancer; in Locust Valley, N.Y. Dey, who was often referred to as Mr. Golf, was the world's undisputed authority on the rules of his sport. Dey had a yearning to be a minister and once said, "The ministry can be practiced in many ways: a writer molding words into a message, a painter transferring his heart to a canvas, a musician composing a beautiful hymn, or a golf official trying to protect the standards of the game."

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