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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
February 04, 1985
BLOOD SPORT Sir:I was appalled when I read the special report by Bjarne Rostaing and Robert Sullivan on blood doping by some members of the 1984 U.S. Olympic cycling team (Triumphs Tainted With Blood, Jan. 21). But I was even more appalled by the attitudes of team technical director Ed Burke and team manager Mike Fraysse concerning the matter.
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February 04, 1985

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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YEAR

TEAM

PLAYER(S)

1985

49ers

Bill Ring, Todd Shell, Tom Holmoe

1984

Raiders

Marc Wilson, Todd Christensen

1983

Redskins

Matt Mendenhall

1982

49ers

Ring

1981

Raiders

Wilson, Christensen

BLOOD SPORT
Sir:
I was appalled when I read the special report by Bjarne Rostaing and Robert Sullivan on blood doping by some members of the 1984 U.S. Olympic cycling team (Triumphs Tainted With Blood, Jan. 21). But I was even more appalled by the attitudes of team technical director Ed Burke and team manager Mike Fraysse concerning the matter.

Burke says, "You know where we were in the dark ages. You know where we are now," as if blood doping were some miracle innovation, and we should all rejoice in its discovery. Blood doping is dangerous and unethical. If I were a cyclist, I would reject it instantly. To me, winning is nothing if I can't do it on natural ability.

Fraysse says "We've been looking into this stuff for years and years and years. We weren't gonna fall behind the Russians or East Germans any more." So instead we'll just stoop to their level of immoral and artificial ways of winning, eh, Mike?
TIM FOSKEY
Chapel Hill, N.C.

Sir:
I am 13, and my dream is to be a part of the 1992 Olympic cycling team. I look up to our 1984 team and, most of all, to coach Edward (Eddie B.) Borysewicz. Even so, I think blood boosting is wrong. There probably is a greater chance of getting sick from blood packing than there is of getting extra energy from it. Athletes are not machines.
MIKE MURPHY
Annandale, Va.

Sir:
Thank you for the informative article on our Olympians who resorted to blood boosting in the '84 Games. Competitive sports would be much better off if all athletes refrained from such activities. Then the athlete who best conditioned himself through hard, honest training would be victorious. Besides, how can any athlete find gratification in winning an event or setting a record when he or she relies on an artificial means of improving performance?
THOMAS V. WILLIAMS
Charleston, S.C.

Sir:
Maybe a few words should be added to the Olympic credo: "No additives, no preservatives, no artificial anything."
BERNARD P. MCGOVERN
Jackson, N.J.

Sir:
As cyclists, we thank you for your coverage of Olympic cycling. We hope you will continue to show the American people this sport. On the other hand, we hope that you, as sports-minded people, will take a second look at the blood-boosting issue.

Many artificial means of enhancing performance are accepted by cyclists, including aerodynamic helmets and wheels, vitamin injections and some carbo loading. Where does it stop? Will all athletes be asked to quit the intense training programs that they presently follow simply because one athlete may gain an advantage over another?
MIKE F. HUNTINGTON
SCOTT A. STRECKER
Hutchinson, Kans.

Sir:
Once again the U.S athlete is hanged—not by the world, but by his own people. I am not making a judgment as to whether blood boosting is right or wrong. That is a decision to be made by a duly appointed committee of medical and technical people. My blood pressure rises (without boosting), however, when people like Dr. Irving Dardik, director of the USOC investigative committee, throw verbal brickbats at Americans but do nothing about the worldwide problem.

If the IOC decides that blood boosting is illegal, let it declare it so. I'd love to know how the IOC would enforce such a rule.
JOHN H. SHUE
York, Pa.

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