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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
April 22, 1985
NO. 1 CATS Sir:How about them Cats? Congratulations to coach Rollie Massimino and his upstart NCAA champions. Villanova truly is a team of destiny. Curry Kirkpatrick (Shooting The Lights Out, April 8) did such a masterful job of capturing the character of Villanova and its basketball program that we 'Nova fans might forgive you for the lack of respect afforded the Wildcats in your weekly polls during the regular season.PAUL DISDIER Haddonfield, N.J.
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April 22, 1985

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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But I did believe it. And I'm grateful. The author starts with a character far too ridiculous even for fiction and makes him completely real. Thank Plimpton for enticing me into his dreamland. I wish I could have stayed.
STEPHEN MARK
New Haven, Conn.

Sir:
Because I live overseas, I have not seen major league baseball for a few years. I had been reading about it in newspapers and in SI, though, and what I'd read hadn't made me too anxious to get back to the old ball park. Arbitration, coke rehab, threatened strikes, etc. seemed to dominate the headlines. Then I read about Sidd Finch. My dreams that night had Finch pitching every game—each with only 81 pitches being thrown. I also envisioned SRO crowds, a new, faster pitching machine made so players could adjust and, finally, Reggie Jackson connecting on a 700-foot home run. I woke up with Finch still on the mound. Then I saw the issue date. No, please, the story has to be true!
DON HOBBS
Kadena Air Base, Okinawa

Sir:
I'm not sure which was more fun: reading Plimpton's tale in amazement or rereading it after the truth was known.
KEVIN CARTIER
Newton, Iowa

Sir:
Now come on! How can you do this to your loyal and serious sports fans, making fools of us who quote your periodical like the Bible?
KEVIN W. KAUFFMAN
Columbia City, Ind.

Sir:
I have concluded that April Fools' Day will come again, but not your magazine. Cancel my subscription immediately.
NICHOLAS V. LONGO
Yonkers, N.Y.

Sir:
Although Sidd Finch turned out to be fictional, the story underlined the freshness, excitement, innocence and eccentricity that are missing from baseball today.
MERLE GOOD
Orinda, Calif.

Sir:
George Steinbrenner had probably already taken out his checkbook after reading about Sidd Finch. A great piece of writing by George Plimpton.
JIM SAUL
Fort Wayne, Ind.

Sir:
While my wife insisted that Sidd Finch was a product of George Plimpton's rich imagination, I had no problem visualizing a multilingual Buddhist recluse with a French horn and a 168 mph fastball pitching for the Mets. What I couldn't quite picture was New York City with more than one Yogi.
MARTIN R. MOEN
Seattle

THE SARAZEN COLLECTION
Sir:
My eye was caught by the handsome trophies displayed in the photograph of Gene Sarazen on the opening page of Sarah Ballard's April 8 feature on him (The Golden Double Eagle). I can guess what the sculpture of the two eagles commemorates, but what do the crystal bowl and the silver trophy represent?
HARVEY NATHAN
New York City

?The eagles, honoring, of course, Sarazen's famed double eagle on the 15th hole of the 1935 Masters, were a gift from the city of Albany, N.Y., where Sarazen plays in a charity event each year. The bowl was awarded to him for winning that Masters. The silver prize is a scaled-down replica of the British Open trophy he won in 1932.—ED.

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