SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
June 03, 1985
UEBERROTH'S MOVESir:It's about time somebody decided to get the drugs out of baseball (The Commissioner Gels Tough, May 20). Hats off to Peter Ueberroth! But why did it take so long? Also, Boston pitcher Bob Stanley shouldn't feel the way he does about drug testing. I am a bartender, and having to take a lie-detector test (and passing) didn't bother me, so why not cooperate. Bob?CHUCK HARNISH West Palm Beach, Fla.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
June 03, 1985

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

UEBERROTH'S MOVE
Sir:
It's about time somebody decided to get the drugs out of baseball (The Commissioner Gels Tough, May 20). Hats off to Peter Ueberroth! But why did it take so long? Also, Boston pitcher Bob Stanley shouldn't feel the way he does about drug testing. I am a bartender, and having to take a lie-detector test (and passing) didn't bother me, so why not cooperate. Bob?
CHUCK HARNISH
West Palm Beach, Fla.

Sir:
That was a splendid piece on commissioner Peter Ueberroth. Let's hope his courageous and timely acts inspire his counterpart in pro football to blow the whistle on the NFL's problem. Ueberroth is doing the whole nation a favor. More power to him.
ROBERT FARRIS THOMPSON
New Haven, Conn.

Sir:
If the police want to search my house for drugs, they need a warrant. Shouldn't Peter Ueberroth be required to have at least that much legal backing before searching the bodies of baseball employees? If the police or prosecutors ask me if I use drugs, I can refuse to answer because the law protects me from self-incrimination. Shouldn't baseball's employees enjoy the same protection from tests that could cost them their reputations and their jobs?

Tyrants always justify their actions on the grounds of necessity. We cannot afford to be free, they argue; it's too dangerous. A major drug scandal would seriously damage baseball, cutting into the gate and the TV money, and that is far more important than freedom. Or is it?
JERRY SULLIVAN
Chicago

CHEMICAL REACTIONS (CONT.)
Sir:
In your special report concerning the use of anabolic steroids by athletes (The Steroid Explosion, May 13), you failed to mention that there have been two medically documented cases of liver cancer associated with the use of anabolic steroids in otherwise healthy athletes. One of the two athletes is deceased, and the other has had two-thirds of his liver removed through surgery.
WYLIE L. OVERLY, M.D.
Latrobe, Pa.

Sir:
In your piece on steroid dealer Charles Radler, you refer to a 1983 CBS Evening News story that you say "mentioned" Radler. In fact, our story was the result of an investigation of Radler's operation, and it gave national attention to the apparently illegal distribution of steroids to virtually anyone who cared to call.

Radler told you that our story caused his business to "zoom"; what he didn't tell you was that our story also caused Pennsylvania authorities to open the investigation that led to the end of Radler's business, and to his indictment.
ROME J. HARTMAN
Producer, CBS News
Atlanta

THE EWING LOTTERY
Sir:
I would love to admit to being a Knicks fan again, but before I get tickets, please tell me that Morin Bishop's story on Patrick Ewing, (Live From New York, It's St. Patrick's Day, May 20) is not another Sidd Finch tale. To a Knicks fan, it's too good to be true.
KEITH MacDOWALL
New Haven, Conn.

Sir:
Patrick and Bernard—wow!
STEVE RISWOLD
Dell Rapids, S. Dak.

Sir:
As fans of the Boston Celtics, we can honestly state that the Patrick Ewing cover scared the hell out of us!
JOHN MCGOVERN JR.
ED KENNEDY III
North Quincy, Mass.

Continue Story
1 2 3