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WHEN THIS BALTIMOREAN GOT ROLLING, HE STRUCK A BLOW FOR MANLY VIRTUE
Linell Smith
June 03, 1985
When the honor roll of Baltimore's champions is called, you hear names like Johnny Unitas and Brooks Robinson. Well, here's one hero you may have missed: G. Howell Parr, who performed the longest documented human roll in history, in May 1914.
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June 03, 1985

When This Baltimorean Got Rolling, He Struck A Blow For Manly Virtue

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The Sun, on the other hand, defended Parr's accomplishment as a demonstration of manly virtues: "Critics should remember that even an undertaking like this, which in itself is absurd and useless, is redeemed by the spirit in which it is done.... Mr. Parr's performance adds not only to the harmless gayety [sic] of the public, without forming a menace to its morals like the tango, but it suggests that members of all classes of society in this American nation are ready to endure hardship and to encounter risk of bodily injury rather than weaken in a test of manhood and courage." Moral approbation was not Parr's only reward. His journey had won him almost 26� per roll.

Afterward, Parr rested on his laurels, and the record that he made lying down still stands today.

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