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Seattle's new power source
Ivan Maisel
July 01, 1985
Phil Bradley is turning heads—especially those of opposing outfielders
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July 01, 1985

Seattle's New Power Source

Phil Bradley is turning heads—especially those of opposing outfielders

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And Bradley loved the ol' pigskin. He accepted a football scholarship from Missouri because 1) the Tigers ran a veer offense similar to his high school's and 2) the football coach would allow him to play baseball. Bradley became a three-time All-Big Eight quarterback, setting 15 school records. He also hit .457 in his senior year, and—please note—led the team in home runs with four.

"My junior year, the baseball people were scared of the football people and didn't draft me," Bradley says. "In my senior year, the football people were scared of the baseball people." Bradley had a storied collegiate career. He played in both the Hula and Japan bowls, but then waited in vain for the phone to ring on draft day. "That still rankles him," his father says. "There were 332 people drafted and he wasn't one of them."

There was an offer from the British Columbia Lions of the Canadian Football League, but Bradley would have had to report to training camp at the end of May, days before the baseball draft. In a sense, the calendar made his decision for him. The Mariners made him their selection in the third round and signed him to a $25,000 bonus. Suddenly, he was an ex-football player.

Now he's an ex-singles hitter. And in Columbia, Mo. fans are mounting a "Fill in for Phil" write-in campaign to put him on the All-Star team.

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