SI Vault
 
A roundup of the week Sept. 30-Oct. 6
Compiled by DUNCAN BRANTLEY
October 14, 1985
ARCHERY—RICHARD McKINNEY of the U.S. defeated Koo Je Chong of South Korea 2,601 to 2,592 points and won his third men's world championship, in Seoul, South Korea. IRINA SOLDATOVA of the U.S.S.R. edged teammate Ludmilla Arzhanikova 2,592 to 2,589 to win the women's title. South Korea upset the U.S. for the men's team title and the Soviet Union beat South Korea for the women's.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
October 14, 1985

A Roundup Of The Week Sept. 30-oct. 6

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

ARCHERY—RICHARD McKINNEY of the U.S. defeated Koo Je Chong of South Korea 2,601 to 2,592 points and won his third men's world championship, in Seoul, South Korea. IRINA SOLDATOVA of the U.S.S.R. edged teammate Ludmilla Arzhanikova 2,592 to 2,589 to win the women's title. South Korea upset the U.S. for the men's team title and the Soviet Union beat South Korea for the women's.

BOWLING—Ken Taniguchi of Japan beat countryman Kiyoshi Nakarai by 12 pins to win the PBA's Japan Cup in Tokyo.

PRO FOOTBALL—With the Redskins no longer as fiesty as they used to be, the Cowboys were looking for somebody new to fuss with and they found the Giants. "They are fakes," said Dallas strong safety Dextor Clinkscale before the game. "We have a vendetta against them because they are the reason we didn't make [last season's] playoffs." The Giants were for real, but so were the Cowboys as they bested New York 30-29. The Rams could thank their defense that they escaped with a 13-10 win over Minnesota to run their record to 5-0. On the final two plays of the game, the Vikings had the ball within the one-yard line. Coach Bud Grant spurned attempts at a tying field goal and went for a winning touchdown instead, but was stopped both times. The Bears also spit-shined their perfect record by coming back from a 12-3 halftime deficit to score 24 second-half points in a 27-19 victory over Tampa Bay. The 5-0 start is the best for the Bears since 1963, when they won their last NFL championship. San Francisco's Joe Montana had his best day ever as a pro, passing for 429 yards and five TDs as the 'Niners drubbed Atlanta 38-17. Miami nipped Pittsburgh in the last 47 seconds to win 24-20 (page 24). Saying sorry to Indianapolis didn't make the 1-3 Colts feel much better; early in the week the NFL admitted that the refs had flubbed a crucial fourth-down call in their Sept. 29 25-20 loss to the Jets. So the Colts channeled their anger into a 49-17 blowout of Buffalo. The Jets, however, benefited again from a controversial call; an interception by Cincinnati cornerback Louis Breeden was assumed to be a touchback but was ruled a two-point safety. After the ensuing kickoff New York scored a quick TD, and the nine points provided the winning margin in the 29-20 Jets victory. The AFC's Western Division is in a logjam, with four of the five teams ( Chiefs, Broncos, Raiders and Seahawks) sporting 3-2 records. Just off the pace were the 2-3 Chargers, who lost to Seattle 26-21. In other games, Green Bay surprised Detroit 43-10, New Orleans edged Philadelphia 23-21 and Cleveland was a 24-20 victor over New England in Bernie Kosar's promising (9 for 15 and 104 yards) pro debut.

GOLF—TIM SIMPSON shot a course-record-tying 16-under-par 264 to beat Clarence Rose by two strokes and win the Southern Open in Columbus, Ga. The victory earned him $63,000.

Earlier in the week JOHN MAHAFFEY beat Jodie Mudd on the second hole of sudden death to win $63,000 and the rain-delayed Texas Open. Mahaffey and Mudd shot 12-under-par 268s for 72 holes.

HORSE RACING—VANLANDINGHAM ($8.40), Pat Day in the saddle, won the Jockey Club Gold Cup at Belmont Park (page 107).

Rainbow Quest (8-1) finished a neck behind Sagace but won the Prix de l' Arc de Triomphe at Longchamp in Paris when Sagace was disqualified for bumping him twice in the stretch. The 4-year-old colt covered the 1� miles in 2:29[5/10].

MOTOR SPORTS—NIGEL MANSELL of England, driving a Williams- Honda, won the European Grand Prix in Brands Hatch, England, while France's ALAIN PROST, in a McLaren- Porsche, finished fourth to clinch the 1985 World Driving Championship. Mansell averaged 125.527 mph for 196 miles on the 2.6-mile circuit to beat Brazil's Ayrton Senna, in a Lotus- Renault, by 21.39 seconds.

Bobby Rahal averaged 112.923 mph and defeated Al Unser Sr. by 12.72 seconds to win $53,484 and a 186.2 mile CART Indy-Car race held in Monterey, Calif.

Cale Yarborough drove his Ford Thunder-bird to victory in a 500-mile NASCAR event at the Charlotte Motor Speedway, finishing one second ahead of Bill Elliott, also in a Thunderbird. Yarborough won $51,600 and averaged 136.761 mph around the 1.5 mile quad-oval.

Continue Story
1 2 3