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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
January 10, 1983
YOUNG GRETZKYSir:Congratulations to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED for having the good taste to choose Wayne Gretzky as 1982's Sportsman of the Year (Greatness Confirmed, Dec. 27-Jan. 3), and congratulations to Wayne Gretzky for earning this honor.
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January 10, 1983

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Lanker's obvious technical talent and originality are inspirational as well as entertaining. I hope more of his work will grace future issues.
JEFF RAPSON
New York City

Sir:
Pieces of '82 was a most welcome Christmas present. SI has always strived to show the American public, via photojournalism, the grace of athletic endeavor. Brian Lanker's photographic essay surpasses all the others you have published. He deserves boundless credit, especially for the picture of Larry Holmes holding his infant son. The brutality of the boxing ring isn't forgotten but put into perspective when placed alongside the love of a father for a child. The strength and the fragility, the awareness and the naivet�—this picture is staggering in its honesty.

SPORTS ILLUSTRATED has brought to me many hours of thought-provoking, as well as lighthearted, reading, but Pieces of '82 is to be treasured by all who follow sport.
JEFFREY C. SIEGEL, PH.D.
Forensic and Clinical Psychology
Dallas

THE GREAT HAWAIIAN FOOTRACE
Sir:
Finding an article by Kenny Moore in your year-end issue (To the Limit and Beyond, Dec. 27-Jan. 3) was indeed a pleasure. He is that rare combination of a tried and tested athlete and a person whose perception and sensitivity, as evidenced by his writing, extend way beyond the mere recounting of an event. Articles of the caliber of Moore's serve to elevate your magazine above sports to life itself—a perspective from which we all can benefit.

Concerning his performance in the second Great Hawaiian Footrace, I would offer this advice to Moore: To know that "the price is greater for one's being fully conscious of it" and then to continue in spite of that knowledge can only be very foolish or very courageous. "And each successive shot was another loud, fateful rap on the door of my undoing."—Camus, The Stranger.
TED STROJNY
Wrentham, Mass.

Sir:
Kenny Moore's article To the Limit and Beyond was excellent. I would like to point out that Moore's isolated episode of "heart-blood red" urine was probably not caused by a traumatized bladder, as suggested by Dr. Rudy Dressendorfer, but was more likely secondary to the rapid and intense destruction of striated muscle fibers that can occur with extreme exertion, particularly in hot weather. This will release myoglobin into the bloodstream, which leads to myoglobinuria (myoglobin in the urine) and, as the result, dark-red to burgundy-colored urine. This also can lead to kidney damage and acute renal failure. Moore is lucky he recovered as rapidly as he did and was probably helped by the large amount of fluid he ingested after the race.

I would strongly suspect that Dr. Dressendorfer's daily blood studies to detect elevations in heart enzymes instead showed elevation of Moore's muscle enzymes over this period.
GARY NEWMAN, M.D.
Philadelphia

EWING VS. SAMPSON
Sir:
As a Virginia alumnus and avid Cavalier fan, I thoroughly enjoyed your Dec. 20 cover story on Virginia's victory over Georgetown (When Push Came to Shove). I was delighted with the thorough coverage you provided. However, I take exception to Curry Kirkpatrick's conclusions about the Ralph Sampson-Patrick Ewing duel. I thought Ewing played very well against Sampson and that the duel wasn't as one-sided as the article indicated. Ewing did a fine job against the best player in college basketball today. I hope Kirkpatrick's comments weren't designed to get Ewing psyched up for a potential rematch in March. I shudder to think of him playing with even more intensity than he already does.
KURT J. POMRENKE
Bristol, Va.

Sir:
The matchup between Ewing and Sampson was a thing of beauty. While Curry Kirkpatrick correctly stated that Sampson proved himself to be the better of the two, I think more credit should have been bestowed on Ewing for playing a courageous game against a taller and more seasoned opponent. Big Ralph is No. 1 now, but Ewing will assume that role one day.
WILLIAM S. HENRY
Gastonia, N.C.

Sir:
Your comments about Ralph Sampson were a bit too much. You seem to think he's the greatest ever in college basketball. But how many times has he led Virginia to the NCAA championship?

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