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PRO FOOTBALL
February 16, 1983
The NFL season that almost wasn't ended fittingly when a team that many thought couldn't, the Washington Redskins, overran the Miami Dolphins 27-17 in the Super Bowl. The Skins and the Fins earned a shot at each other by surviving the special 16-team, four-week playoff tournament that was a by-product of the 57-day NFL Players Association strike. Miami's Killer Bee defense—with some extra D courtesy of Linebacker A.J. Duhe, who picked off three passes—beat the Jets 14-0 for the AFC Championship. And in a game that many thought would make the Super Bowl an anticlimax, Washington whipped Dallas 31-17 for the NFC title as Defensive End Dexter Manley knocked Cowboy Quarterback Danny White cold and tipped a pass by White's successor, Gary Hogeboom, that was returned for the clinching score. But Coach of the Year Joe Gibbs's team couldn't have been keener in Pasadena. Washington trailed 17-10 at the half after the Dolphins' Fulton walker returned a kickoff 98 yards for a touchdown and a Super Bowl record. But in the second half Miami Quarterback David woodley wobbled, and the Hogs, Washington's meaty offensive line, cleared the way for its chief porker, Fullback John Riggins (right). He scored the winning TD on a 43-yard romp from scrimmage, set a single-game Super Bowl rushing record with 166 yards, 10 fewer than Miami as a team got.
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February 16, 1983

Pro Football

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The NFL season that almost wasn't ended fittingly when a team that many thought couldn't, the Washington Redskins, overran the Miami Dolphins 27-17 in the Super Bowl. The Skins and the Fins earned a shot at each other by surviving the special 16-team, four-week playoff tournament that was a by-product of the 57-day NFL Players Association strike. Miami's Killer Bee defense—with some extra D courtesy of Linebacker A.J. Duhe, who picked off three passes—beat the Jets 14-0 for the AFC Championship. And in a game that many thought would make the Super Bowl an anticlimax, Washington whipped Dallas 31-17 for the NFC title as Defensive End Dexter Manley knocked Cowboy Quarterback Danny White cold and tipped a pass by White's successor, Gary Hogeboom, that was returned for the clinching score. But Coach of the Year Joe Gibbs's team couldn't have been keener in Pasadena. Washington trailed 17-10 at the half after the Dolphins' Fulton walker returned a kickoff 98 yards for a touchdown and a Super Bowl record. But in the second half Miami Quarterback David woodley wobbled, and the Hogs, Washington's meaty offensive line, cleared the way for its chief porker, Fullback John Riggins (right). He scored the winning TD on a 43-yard romp from scrimmage, set a single-game Super Bowl rushing record with 166 yards, 10 fewer than Miami as a team got.

Theismann's finger thwarted Kim Bokamper's Super Bowl interception.

Jimmy Cefalo ran 45 yards with a 31-yard pass for the first touchdown of the Super Bowl.

Theismann passed for 143 yards, including a Super touchdown apiece to the Smurfs, Alvin Garrett and Charlie Brown.

A posse couldn't catch Walker (left) on this kickoff return of 98 yards, almost twice the total of Redskin returners like Mike Nelms (above).

Footloose and fancy Freeman McNeil of the Jets led the NFL in rushing.

Buffalo wouldn't renegotiate, but Joe Cribbs negotiated for 633 yards.

Eddie Lee Ivery, Green Bay's top runner, finished third in the league in touchdowns.

The Cowboys' Tony Dorsett led the NFC in rushing with 745 yards.

By banging for four yards a crack, the Dolphins' Andra Franklin drew comparisons with former Miami Fullback Larry Csonka.

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