SI Vault
 
Big Fish In A Big Pond
Jack McCallum
May 02, 1983
Even in the deep pool of lightweight talent, 20-year-old Edwin Rosario may be the toughest boxer to catch
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
May 02, 1983

Big Fish In A Big Pond

Even in the deep pool of lightweight talent, 20-year-old Edwin Rosario may be the toughest boxer to catch

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4

Rosario has been fishing since he was a boy. A few months ago he and Torres snagged a 700-pound hammerhead shark with a net and sold the meat. He fishes from a boat or underwater with a speargun, or he spends his time setting lobster traps. "Everything but sitting on the shore with a pole," Edwin says. "That's for old men."

His love of the sea goes beyond fishing. He likes to row or take walks on the beach with Alma, or he'll just swim alone, staying in the water for four hours at a time. Naturally, he does his five-mile morning run on the Punta Salinas road along the ocean. He seems to most enjoy playing tour guide for visitors as he hops barefoot along the needle-sharp coral rocks at the ocean's edge: "Look here, look here. This is where we caught the shark. This is where we go for shrimp. That point over there is good for catfish." Asked whether he prefers boxing or fishing more, he replies, "Fishing."

"Sometimes I can't believe it's the same guy in the ring that I know," Torres says. Rosario doesn't train with any ferocity. Siaca sets his regimen; Rosario just follows. "He's gotten a lot more serious lately," says one of Siaca's gym rats, 17-year-old Edwin Rodriguez. "He used to fool around and make jokes, but not anymore."

For Rosario, boxing is a means to an end. "All I want someday is to have a house by the beach, to be near the water, do my fishing," he says. And while he goes after that goal, it's going to be no day at the beach for his opponents.

1 2 3 4