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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
July 11, 1983
ROBERTO DURAN Sir:Thank you for William Nack's article on Roberto Duran's victory over Davey Moore (He That Was Lost Has Been Found, June 27). Even though Duran had lost to Wilfred Benitez and then to an almost unknown Kirk-land Laing, we Duran fans had never given up hope. Ray Arcel's comment after the Moore fight was perfect: "Ah, he was an artist." If there has been a bigger comeback in boxing, I would like to know of it.BRIAN LAKATOSHFogelsville, Pa.
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July 11, 1983

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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ROBERTO DURAN
Sir:
Thank you for William Nack's article on Roberto Duran's victory over Davey Moore (He That Was Lost Has Been Found, June 27). Even though Duran had lost to Wilfred Benitez and then to an almost unknown Kirk-land Laing, we Duran fans had never given up hope. Ray Arcel's comment after the Moore fight was perfect: "Ah, he was an artist." If there has been a bigger comeback in boxing, I would like to know of it.
BRIAN LAKATOSH
Fogelsville, Pa.

Sir:
Roberto Duran has finally silenced his critics and laid to rest the no m�s chapter of his boxing career. I hope his thrashing of Davey Moore proved once and for all that, pound for pound, he is the best fighter who ever lived.
STEVE BEALS
Glendale, Calif.

Sir:
While I enjoyed William Nack's fine article on the comeback of Roberto Duran, I still wonder what all the hoopla is about. Does beating up an inexperienced "champion" with a mere 12 fights to his credit really make up for the no m�s disgrace in New Orleans? No. Is Duran really the Duran of old, and could he avenge his embarrassing loss to Sugar Ray Leonard? No. And can Duran last a full fight with Marvin Hagler, let alone actually win? Seriously now....
JACK BUNGART
Merced, Calif.

Sir:
You have missed the whole point of Duran's fall from grace. After he quit in the Leonard fight, it was not his fighting skills that were questioned, but his heart. When he beat Davey Moore, he did not show any heart, only the skills and experience that had made him a good fighter. When he is able to take the kind of beating that he inflicted on Moore and keep fighting gamely as Moore did, then and only then will he have redeemed himself.
WALTER MIDDLETON
Brownwood, Texas

Sir:
I was horrified by the pictures you printed of the Duran-Moore fight. They showed one man being brutalized and severely injured by another in the name of sport. In view of SI's recent special report suggesting that progressive brain damage is suffered by boxers, including the charismatic Muhammad Ali, I would have thought that you would have discussed Moore's injuries in greater detail.

Those pictures clearly demonstrated that a civilized society should ban boxing altogether, or devise adequate rules and equipment to protect the unfortunate participants.
TOBEY W. KACZENSKY
Rockville, Md.

Sir:
Roberto Duran's brutal beating of Davey Moore demonstrated that all the headgear, 12-round bouts and mandatory eight-counts in the world cannot undo the damage caused by an inept referee and an overly optimistic corner. Allowing a courageous but thoroughly beaten Moore to accept more punishment when he was plainly unable to summon the strength to hurt Duran only resulted in a sickening spectacle. Ringside physicians must be allowed to intervene to save fighters from the consequences of such callousness.
ROBERT GRESHES
Lake Grove, N.Y.

Sir:
Your cover photograph of Roberto Duran "mauling" Davey Moore's face is a perfect example of why professional boxing should be abolished.
MICHAEL E. LENNARTZ
Milwaukee

OAKMONT'S OPEN
Sir:
Congratulations to Dan Jenkins for another exceptional article (Lord, Nelson Was Tougher Than the Iron Men, June 27). He captured the drama of this year's U.S. Open while pointing out the one deficiency: a poorly planned, ludicrously brutal layout.

The courses used for the British Open provide a better battle. When at war, one must always have the option of an all-out, desperate charge to victory. Merely hoping to come out even, as players were forced to do at Oakmont, is a no-win proposition.
CRAIG ROSE
Pacifica, Calif.

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