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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 17, 1983
GUARDIAN OF THE INTERIOR (CONT.)Sir:I would like to commend SI on its Special Report about James Watt and the Department of the Interior (Alone in the Wilderness, Oct. 3). Our great outdoors is more important than people think.
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October 17, 1983

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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GUARDIAN OF THE INTERIOR (CONT.)
Sir:
I would like to commend SI on its Special Report about James Watt and the Department of the Interior (Alone in the Wilderness, Oct. 3). Our great outdoors is more important than people think.

I'm just your everyday, 40-hour-a-week person who likes to get away on weekends. There's a special feeling that some people get when they venture into the wilderness—a feeling of freedom, seclusion and, most of all, an understanding of the natural world. Unfortunately, Watt will never know what that's all about, but thank God some of us do!
KELLY SIMMONS
Worcester, Mass.

Sir:
Thank you for 14 well-written pages on James Watt. I've always considered him one of America's finest athletes. Maybe you could run an article on Henry Kissinger, my choice for Sportsman of the Year.
NEIL Z. KAMELHAR
New York City

LEFTY
Sir:
Steve Wulf's article on Steve Carlton and the Phillies (Philly Is Streaking for Home, Oct. 3), accompanied by your sarcastic cover billing (Hey Lefty, Tell Us How You Won No. 300), annoyed me very much. Perhaps you folks need to be reminded that the most important aspect of any athlete is how he performs on the field, not whether he grants interviews to sportswriters. As a pitcher, Carlton has few peers; clearly he is one of the best ever. Not speaking with reporters is his prerogative, and given the nature of the comments made by many sports figures today, I wouldn't mind if more of them kept their thoughts to themselves.

I would have hoped for greater objectivity in the recording of a major milestone in the career of one of baseball's alltime greats. Carlton's actions speak far louder than his words ever could.
MARC R. INVER
Philadelphia

Sir:
True baseball fans, especially in the Philadelphia area, know Steve Carlton talks to the fans every time he steps on the field. Lefty doesn't have to "tell" us how he won No. 300. We saw it!
LINDA G. CAREY
Linwood, N.J.

JOHNNY AND CARL
Sir:
I grew up following the illustrious careers of both Johnny Bench and Carl Yastrzemski (Memories Are Made of This, Oct. 3). With the free agency and contracts nowadays, Johnny and Carl might be the last two superstars to spend their entire careers with one team. Goodby to two of the great ones, and thanks for the memories.
JOE E. URBAN
Warrenville, Ill.

Sir:
Waiting at the airport to fly to Boston for "Yaz Day," I was thrilled to read the tribute to Johnny Bench and Carl Yastrzemski. William Nack gave us a superb article. As a follower of Yaz since 1961, when I was 10, I will truly miss the excitement that he has provided over the past 23 years. Although Yaz never attained his goal of a world championship, he did something much greater. He thrilled a city for three decades and, just as important, thrilled small-town people like me. Thank you, Carl.
THOMAS V. FANNING
Camden, N.Y.

DOWN UNDER ON TOP
Sir:
Unbelievable! I just don't see how you did it. I am referring to your remarkable job in putting together the America's Cup race story and pictures (It Isn't America's Cup Any Longer, Oct. 3) on a Monday night, and having it printed and labeled and mailed in time to be delivered to me here in California on Thursday.

I am aware that the rest of your publication was probably ready to go, but it still is a fantastic job.
GEORGE (BUD) BLOOMER
Van Nuys, Calif.

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