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The Orioles All Pitched In
Steve Wulf
October 24, 1983
Baltimore overwhelmed Philadelphia in five games in the World Series with an exemplary team effort that featured rookie Pitcher Mike Boddicker and three tough Stooges
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October 24, 1983

The Orioles All Pitched In

Baltimore overwhelmed Philadelphia in five games in the World Series with an exemplary team effort that featured rookie Pitcher Mike Boddicker and three tough Stooges

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Denny was equally impressive at the outset, allowing only an infield single in the first three innings. His father had made the trip to attend one of his son's games for the first time since Little League. But symbolism fans had noticed that when Denny went to pick up a white balloon that had blown onto the field before the start of the first inning, it burst as soon as he touched it.

The Orioles struck first, in the fourth. They loaded the bases with none out on consecutive singles by Dwyer, Ripken and Murray, who got his first hit since his first at bat in the opening game. After Lowenstein struck out, Dauer lashed a two-run single to the opposite field in right. "All year we've been trying to get him to go the other way, and today he finally did it," said an Oriole scout.

Rose, back in the lineup, singled with one out in the bottom of the fourth, and got a stooping, if not a standing, ovation. Schmidt, mired even deeper than Murray, finally broke his 0 for 13 schneid in the bottom of the fourth with a broken-bat single. Then Lefebvre doubled down the line in right to score Rose, and Matthews walked. But the rally died when Greg Gross grounded into a double play, Dauer, unassisted, to Murray.

The Phillies took a 3-2 lead in the fifth on a double by Diaz, a wild pitch, a single by Denny, who went to second on the throw to the plate, and a double by Rose, who seemed to want very much to be a hero. There was another bad omen, though, for the Phillies. "It seems that every time Denny runs the bases," said Phillie owner Bill Giles, "he doesn't pitch well the next few innings."

Indeed, in the sixth, Lowenstein singled and Dauer doubled past Schmidt. At this point, Altobelli began to maneuver as if this were the World Series or something. He sent up four consecutive pinch hitters, a Series record. Joe Nolan, batting for Cruz, was walked intentionally; Singleton, for Dempsey, walked with the bases loaded; Shelby, facing Hernandez, gave the O's the lead with a sacrifice fly that Matthews caught with a spectacular leap against the fence in left; and Ford, batting for Bumbry against Ron Reed, struck out.

Stewart, the Throwin' Swannanoan (he's from Swannanoa, N.C.), came on to pitch in the sixth. Actually, he had already been busy in the game, washing the windows of the O's bullpen. "They were all scratched and smudged from doubles by Schmidt and [Andre] Dawson and [Dale] Murphy," said Stewart. "So we called down for Windex and towels in the first." For the next 2⅓ innings, Stewart wiped up the Phils. In the meantime, in the seventh, Dauer singled home Dwyer, who had doubled, to give the O's a 5-3 lead.

The Phillies came into the Series with the more ballyhooed bullpen, thanks to the effervescent Holland. But the Orioles' relievers, Stewart and Martinez, had been even more effective. Martinez, who took over in the eighth, has one of the best curveballs in creation. "It's got a real tight spin, so most hitters think it's a fastball," says Pitching Coach Miller. "What makes it even more effective is that Tippy has an 88-mph fastball. When they see this little guy throwing that hard, they don't know what to think."

In the ninth, the crowd finally came alive when Diaz singled with one out. After DeJesus grounded out, Virgil worked a full count, then singled up the middle to score pinch runner Bob Dernier. "I was only trying to create a little excitement, sell some hot dogs," said Martinez. So, with two outs and the tying run on, Martinez was looking at Morgan, whom he had never faced. He showed him his curve, and on the second pitch he gave him another. Morgan lined it weakly to second to end the game.

"I bet we've got them good and overconfident over there," said Rose.

"The last time we were in this position," said Stewart, "we were counting our Series shares and seeing those rings on our fingers. Not this time, though."

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