SI Vault
 
The Hurricane Watch Extends To Nebraska
John Underwood
November 07, 1983
Bernie Kosar, Miami's unfreshmanlike freshman quarterback, characterizes the Hurricane offense as "disciplined." He figures it has to be to execute all the gymnastics and high-wire acts that Coach Howard Schnellenberger demands of it. On the other hand, Miami Middle Guard Tony Fitzpatrick, the stubby block of muscle and mouth who's what you might expect to get if you crossed the understander on an Irish tumbling team with a Tazmanian devil, characterizes the Hurricane defense as "loose" and, well, loud. It rags and jaws and talks trash, and pops opposing players with such percussion the Gatorade trembles in the cups along the sidelines. It harasses, it intimidates, it dominates. In other words, says a rival coach who doesn't have to play Miami this year, "It's a joy to watch."
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November 07, 1983

The Hurricane Watch Extends To Nebraska

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After the Mountaineers capped a game-opening 75-yard drive with a short field goal, the Hurricanes retaliated with an icy-cool 81-yard scoring march. In it the remarkably poised Kosar—his concentration is so good that he says he often doesn't realize he has been knocked down on a pass rush until he finds himself getting back up—completed five passes. Four were to Tight End Glenn Dennison, who has hands like tar buckets and sets a school receiving record every time he catches the ball. His last grab on the drive was for 19 yards and the go-ahead-for-good TD.

Miami went up 10-3 in the second quarter on a 36-yard field goal by Jeff Davis and then opened the third quarter with another long drive that led to a Davis kick from 31 yards. The Hurricanes clinched the game with a 90-yard scoring drive that was climaxed by a five-yard pass from Kosar to Running Back Keith Griffin with 13:13 to play. The big number was a 49-yard pass to Wide Receiver Eddie Brown. Kosar reads blitzes and coverages as if they were primers, and against the Mountaineers he completed 19 of 36 throws for 211 yards and had four or five perfect passes dropped.

The Hurricanes have won 23 of 25 games at home under Schnellenberger, who plucked the Miami program out of the ashes five years ago. After Saturday's game, Schnellenberger, who's apparently into analogies these days, told his team, "It's a horse race now, with other horses ahead but struggling and the finish line in sight." He likened the Hurricanes' circumstances to "being two pitches away from victory in the ninth inning." They believe him.

Who knows? Maybe Nebraska will, too, come Jan. 2.

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