SI Vault
 
A roundup of the week Oct. 24-30
Compiled by DEMMIE STATHOPLOS
November 07, 1983
PRO BASKETBALL—The NBA opened its 38th season with striking referees picketing outside the Spectrum and Madison Square Garden, but it was the substitute referees who were crying foul. Two nights before the league-champion 76ers dispatched the Pacers 124-112 in overtime at Indianapolis (page 66), the Sixers had squeaked out a 117-114 win in their home opener against the Bullets when a technical foul was called on Washington's Jeff Ruland with 12 seconds left on the clock. Bobby Jones made the free throw to break a 114-114 tie. The Bullets then lost 100-97 to the Knicks in a game during which 63 personal fouls were called and 76 free throws were taken. Detroit beat the Celtics 127-121 in a game in which a record 71 personal fouls were assessed. The ref also called six technicals. That's the same number of Ts that were meted out when the Bulls, led by Quintin Dailey's 27 points and rookie Guard Mitchell Wiggins' 26, defeated the Nets 104-97. There were 85 free throws in that game. In his pro debut, Ralph Sampson, the $5 million rookie, helped the Rockets to a 106-100 win over the Spurs by getting 18 points and 12 rebounds, and Dan Issel, 35, became the eighth player in pro basketball history to score more than 25,000 points by pumping in 34 as his Nuggets beat Utah 139-125.
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November 07, 1983

A Roundup Of The Week Oct. 24-30

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Top-seed IVAN LENDL beat Scott Davis 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 to win the $375,000 Grand Prix tournament in Tokyo.

MILEPOSTS—NAMED: As American League Cy Young Award winner, righthander LAMARR HOYT of the Chicago White Sox, who had a 1983 record of 24-10.

TRADED: By the Minnesota North Stars, Center BOBBY SMITH, to the Montreal Canadiens for Center KEITH ACTON, Right Wing MARK NAPIER and a 1984 third-round draft choice.

DIED: AUGUST (IRON MIKE) MICHALSKE, 80, former Green Bay Packer who was the first guard inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame; in De Pere, Wise.

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