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AS A PITCHER, LATER AS A COACH, THE AUTHOR FOUND GLORY TO BE ELUSIVE
Bruce Weber
May 07, 1984
I listen to Nolan Ryan talk about pitching, and I understand. He emphasizes control, says location is more important than speed, that more and more often he goes to breaking balls in key situations. Even for a rifle arm like Ryan, this makes sense. It gives the hitters more variables to consider, and places the game more in the hands of the pitcher. The best pitchers—the Ryans, the Seavers—leave as little as possible to chance and the skills or shortcomings of other men.
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May 07, 1984

As A Pitcher, Later As A Coach, The Author Found Glory To Be Elusive

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"I thought I'd come see you play. I felt bad. You asked me so many times."

"Terrific," I said.

"I liked it," she said.

"Good."

"What's wrong?"

"Nothing."

"But you were wonderful. You should have heard the people talking."

"Thanks."

"But you were. You were so great," she said. "Honey, I don't understand."

"I know," I said.

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