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EXTRA POINTS
Jill Lieber
October 22, 1984
Colts owner Bob Irsay has been relegating visiting team owners to a box behind one end zone in the Hoosier Dome—it looks out between the goal posts. The owners in turn have let commissioner Pete Rozelle know that Irsay-style hospitality doesn't sit well with them.
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October 22, 1984

Extra Points

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QUICK COUNT

Just as there are morning people and night people, NFL teams vary as to when during a game they tend to be hot or cold. Here are the top and bottom teams by quarters so far in 1984:

OFFENSE
Most points scored

1st quarter

Chargers

62

2nd quarter

Dolphins

85

3rd quarter

Dolphins

66

4th quarter

Raiders

78

DEFENSE
Most points allowed

1st quarter

Bills

69

2nd quarter

Colts

81

3rd quarter

Giants

54

4th quarter

Bengals

64

Colts owner Bob Irsay has been relegating visiting team owners to a box behind one end zone in the Hoosier Dome—it looks out between the goal posts. The owners in turn have let commissioner Pete Rozelle know that Irsay-style hospitality doesn't sit well with them.

So before the Colts' most recent home game—Oct. 7 against Washington—Irsay promised the league office that Jack Kent Cooke, the Redskins' owner, would have a box nearer midfield, right across the field from Irsay's. It was a good thing Cooke couldn't make the game; Indianapolis's host with the most had reportedly changed arrangements again, and Cooke would have been right down there behind the end zone.

One irritated NFL executive who got the cheap-seat treatment earlier this season said, "There's a movement among the owners who've been stiffed. When Irsay comes to our stadiums, he may just find himself sitting back in the stands." Out there with the common folk? Perish the thought.

Some USFL owners are saying publicly that "nothing special" will come out of their meeting this weekend at Amelia Island, Fla., but a few others have made it clear that they're expecting fireworks. Says one, "The league is falling apart. We may just decide to fold the whole thing."

In any case, the USFL's expansion-consolidation-relocation committee will present a plan to condense the 18-team league to 12 or 14 clubs for next spring. "We'll show the owners how to go about breaking up a club," says Memphis president Steve Ehrhart, a committee member. "We'll point out which markets are the most productive, where money can be saved, how to set up percentages of control among owners, who gets what title, which players would go where.

"We want the owners to come to their own conclusions on mergers. We don't want to say, 'Team X and Team Y will merge.' We want them to see this is for the good of the league. We don't want to get a lot of noses out of joint."

Coach Bum Phillips burned a hole in New Orleans' pocket when he traded for his old buddy, Houston running back Earl Campbell. The Saints are now paying almost $3 million in salaries to quarterbacks and running backs.

And if the word out of Houston proves to be true—that Campbell is burned out (he has averaged only 42.4 yards rushing per game this season), unmotivated, can't block or catch and is a constant corn-plainer—Phillips may have bought himself quite a bit less than he bargained for.

Says Houston linebacker Gregg Bingham: "Earl wasn't happy here. Unfortunately, when Earl's not happy, he can't produce at a high level. He wears his feelings on his sleeve. When you gain superstar status, you control the tempo of the team. When Earl was in a bad mood, everybody was in a bad mood."

Replies Campbell, "That's his opinion; I expect that from him."

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