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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
November 05, 1984
THAT TIESir:In his article (A Tie That Felt Like A Triumph, Oct. 22). Douglas S. Looney makes much of the Texas Longhorns' determination, their big hearts and their total dedication. Frankly, I'm more impressed with their luck and their gifts from the officials.
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November 05, 1984

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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THAT TIE
Sir:
In his article (A Tie That Felt Like A Triumph, Oct. 22). Douglas S. Looney makes much of the Texas Longhorns' determination, their big hearts and their total dedication. Frankly, I'm more impressed with their luck and their gifts from the officials.

To my mind, the game had very few highlights, with one exception: the Oklahoma defense, which Looney all but ignored. Holding Texas's exalted offense to a mere 96 yards rushing failed to earn the Sooners more than a couple of paragraphs in Looney's glorification of the Longhorns.

All this aside, I can accept the fact that the game ended in a tie, but please don't expect us Sooner fans to accept the injustice and humiliation of being ranked behind the Longhorns in your Top 20 poll (FOOTBALL'S WEEK, Oct. 22).
MARK HAGOOD
Houston

Sir:
The deciding factor in the game was not the Longhorns' determination. It was the incredibly poor officiating. Coach Barry Switzer had every right to complain that Oklahoma was robbed.
MARK PANNES
Norwood, Mass.

Sir:
Texas, not Oklahoma, is the team that needs to look elsewhere for inspiration. The Longhorns showed a complete lack of intestinal fortitude by not going for the win.
JIMMY BROWN
Burns Flat, Okla.

ONLY ONCE TIED
Sir:
In FOOTBALL'S WEEK (Oct. 15), N. Brooks Clark quoted Florida State coach Bobby Bowden after the 17-17 tie with Memphis State as never having been "so happy with a tie game" in his life. I find that quite interesting, because in more than 24 years of college coaching Bowden had never before been involved in a tie.
RALPH SOKOLOWSKY
Orem, Utah

THE ROAR OF '84
Sir:
As a Tiger fanatic and one who was at the ol' ball park for Game 5, I want to thank Steve Wulf for his magnificent account of the Tigers' World Series victory ( Detroit Jumped All Over 'Em, Oct. 22). Most of all, I want to thank Wulf for his lead. It gave me a chill up my spine and perfectly described the feeling I had watching that little white ball rocket out to rightfield. This issue of SI will become part of my memory box of programs, buttons, ticket stubs and newspaper clippings about The Roar of '84.
ROGER LEAVENWORTH
Troy, Mich.

Sir:
How about Sparky Anderson and his gang for Sportsmen of the Year? I realize that Mary Lou Retton, Bill Johnson and the other Olympians were great, but the Tigers' going wire to wire with such dominance was remarkable.
F. PATRICK DEVINE
Birmingham, Mich.

RANDY WHITE
Sir:
I enjoyed John Underwood's story (He'll Tackle Anything, Oct. 22) on Randy White. His dedication to football and his team is something not found in many players. After attending games at Texas Stadium and seeing him in action, I have to agree with a sign I saw posted at the stadium during the preseason: RANDY, WHY ASK FOR $800,000 WHEN YOU'RE WORTH A MILLION?
ANNA THOMPSON
Mesquite, Texas

Sir:
John Underwood says it was "interceptions and offensive misplays that opened the door for the Redskins" in their game against the Cowboys on Oct. 14. It wasn't the Dallas offense that John Riggins ran through for 165 yards, mostly up the middle where the league's greatest fisherman hangs his hook. Next time you do a feature article on the best defensive tackle in the NFL, do it on Washington's Dave Butz, a major reason for offensive misplays.
CHRISTOPHER A. MCCARTHY
Falls Church, Va.

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