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HE BARES HIS SOLE
Jill Lieber
November 12, 1984
Denver's Rich Karlis, who kicks barefoot because it gives him a better feel for the ball, has quite a few fans walking around town with one shoe off, one shoe on. "I'm flattered," says Karlis, a third-year pro who donated his useless right shoe to a charity auction, where it went for $305. "But for those who don't kick for a living, some words of caution—it can get mighty cold."
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November 12, 1984

He Bares His Sole

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Denver's Rich Karlis, who kicks barefoot because it gives him a better feel for the ball, has quite a few fans walking around town with one shoe off, one shoe on. "I'm flattered," says Karlis, a third-year pro who donated his useless right shoe to a charity auction, where it went for $305. "But for those who don't kick for a living, some words of caution—it can get mighty cold."

Some Karlis Krazies, shod only on their left feet, were among the fans who met the team plane at the Denver airport Oct. 28, after Karlis's 35-yard field goal with :00 left in overtime beat the Raiders 22-19.

Then, says Karlis, "There are the TV viewers who insist that everybody who isn't wearing only one shoe leave the room when I'm kicking."

How krazy can they get?

"Last year, when there was a 28-below-zero wind chill in Kansas City, I wore a thin sanitary sock and made a 24-yard field goal," Karlis says. "But later, a woman stopped me in a Denver bank and told me I was a wimp."

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