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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
March 17, 1980
OLYMPIAN PHOTOGRAPHYSir:We waited in anxious anticipation all week. Which shot would it be on the cover of SI? Goalie Jim Craig standing on the ice, draped in the American flag? Captain Mike Eruzione standing on the winners' platform, gold on his chest, hand on his heart, singing the national anthem? Or maybe the shocked Soviets with that "Who are those guys?" look on their faces? But when my March 3 SI arrived—with the picture of America's Team, showing all the joy, enthusiasm and pride that all Americans felt—it was easy to see why SI is the No. 1 sports magazine going.JON PETTUS MIKE PYLE Pittsburg, Kans.
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March 17, 1980

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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GAMES WORDS
Sir:
Your Olympic coverage was magnificent. Even though television commentators and print journalists were reduced to melodramatic blubbering about Tai and Randy, awestruck accounts of Eric Heiden and sheer speechlessness over the U.S. hockey team, your writers put the drama and emotion and euphoria of the Games in perfect perspective. And the photography, as always, was unsurpassed.
JOHN HOLLAR
Dallas

Sir:
If SPORTS ILLUSTRATED doesn't give a gold medal to silver-tongued Bob Ottum for his Winter Olympic reporting it should at least bronze his typewriter.
JON P. KRAUSHAR
New York City

TO GO OR NOT TO GO
Sir:
I haven't decided whether to support the boycott of the Summer Olympics, but if our athletes can give me a tiny part of the thrill at those Games that I got at the Winter Games when our flag went up to the top of the hockey arena with all those thousands of people singing the national anthem, I hope we go.
BILL RAKERS
Marshalltown, Iowa

Sir:
One look at the cover photograph of the U.S. hockey players celebrating their gold-medal effort and I could almost feel the excitement, jubilation and thrill that overcame them. That golden moment will live with those inspiring young men forever. As a potential Summer Olympian, I fail to see how anyone has the right to deprive me of a chance for a similar reaction to a lifelong dream.
STU SWANSON
Pitt Swimming Team
Pittsburgh

Sir:
President Carter's politically inspired decision to boycott the Moscow Olympics will destroy the motivation of thousands of young people and disillusion many more. Our country gains nothing, our athletes are the scapegoats for the political process, and individuals throughout the world are the losers. What will the U.S.S.R. have lost?
STEPHEN B. COHEN
Chicago

Sir:
Your editorial on the Olympic boycott (SCORECARD, March 3) really hit home. It amazes me how this country's public opinion can change so drastically. In a matter of days public sentiment has focused on Eric Heiden and the U.S. hockey team instead of those brave Afghan rebels who are fighting and dying for a country they call home.

I can sympathize with the athletes who have so earnestly trained for the 1980 Summer Games, and with their families. They do deserve better. But I find it hard to agree that the U.S. should send a team to Moscow. If we were to compete in the Games this summer, and present circumstances persisted, we would in effect be saluting military aggression. Communism and the good ol' U.S.S.R. Sure, many American athletes would win medals and, yes, all of us at home would savor those two weeks of watching the world's finest amateurs. But is that really what we want?

President Carter has stood firm in saying we will not send a team to Moscow, so, while we still have time to make a favorable impression on other countries, we Americans should unite behind him and send a strong and clear message to Moscow that we will not put up with its recent act of naked aggression. We may never get a chance to seize this peaceful opportunity again.
JOHN A. HELDT
Pendleton, Ore.

OUR NATIONAL PASTIME
Sir:
Your article on Marvin Miller (Whither Opening Day, 1980? March 3) helped to clarify a complex issue. However, it appears to me that both Marvin and Ranger Relief Pitcher Jim Kern are misinformed. While it is true that the owners are not baseball, neither are the players. As Twins owner Calvin Griffith points out, baseball is the fans. No fans, no money. No money, no salaries. No salaries, no players. No players, no owners.

Keeping this in mind, I would suggest some form of fan representation at player-management talks. I feel that at some point fans will grow tired of insane salaries, suitcase teams and suitcase players. What will happen then?

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