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SURPRISE PARTY FOR INDY
Curry Kirkpatrick
March 24, 1980
Favorites fell left and right in the NCAA regionals and up jumped the likes of Joe Barry Carroll (below) and Purdue, along with Iowa, Louisville and UCLA, for a finals fling
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March 24, 1980

Surprise Party For Indy

Favorites fell left and right in the NCAA regionals and up jumped the likes of Joe Barry Carroll (below) and Purdue, along with Iowa, Louisville and UCLA, for a finals fling

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The heralded duel between the 7'1" Carroll and Duke's 6'11" Mike Gminski finally heated up with about nine minutes left in the game when Carroll banked in a short jumper and Gminski answered with a little whirl-drive against which Carroll committed his fourth foul. With Joe Barry on the bench and Purdue leading 51-48, Purdue went into a stall that lasted, Rose was to say later, "a precious" three minutes and 15 seconds.

Inexplicably, Duke Coach Bill Foster had taken out Gminski and Power Forward Gene Banks, so he rushed them back in the first chance he got. But here came Carroll, too. After Boilermaker Guard Brian Walker made a rally-crushing steal from Vince Taylor, Purdue foul shots helped stretch the margin to 58-50 and to 62-54.

Gminski tipped one in at 1:35, and in the next 41 seconds Purdue turned the ball over three times. But Taylor, another hometown boy, didn't make good—he missed from the baseline—freshman Chip Engelland missed badly from outside, and Taylor missed again. No cigars anywhere. Suddenly there were 54 seconds left, Banks was fouling out, Carroll was converting two free throws (64-56) and the old-gold-and-black-clad Purdue mobs were chanting "J-B-C, J-B-C."

In addition to scoring a game-high 26 points (Gminski had 17 and Banks 14 for Duke), Carroll finally scored with the media people, who were beginning to wonder if he might be Marcel Marceau on stilts. Joe Barry speaks.

"I haven't seen the stats yet. Coach said it was a good night. I gave it the best shot. I'd have to see the films," J.B.C. said.

"You allow respect to generate competition, and once you get past that, you leave it there, you just play 'em," J.B.C. said.

"My motivation is, basically, internalized; external stimulus is not a constant," J.B.C. said.

Yeah, well, thanks, J.B.C. Now back to you, Walter.

Another friend of the press was Indiana Coach Bobby Knight ("Sir Bob," Rose called him), who explained how his technical foul at halftime of the Purdue-Indiana game—over a play that resulted in a measly nine-point swing, giving Purdue a 41-26 lead 10 seconds into the second half—"had no bearing on the outcome." He didn't reveal, however, why he kept the bewildered Hoosiers back home for practices, moved the team from the press hotel to another or kept yanking senior Co-Captain Butch Carter in and out of the game.

"I'd never seen that look in their eyes," Purdue's Arnette Hallman said of the Hoosiers. "They had no control over what was happening." Nor did the normally taciturn Lee Rose when on Saturday afternoon, victory assured, he heaved his program high in the air. It may have landed over on Maxwell Street. Or, like the Purdue Boilermakers, it could have wafted all the way to Indianapolis.

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