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McKAY HAS A NEW RACQUET
Jim Kaplan
April 14, 1980
Heather McKay, unbeaten in squash since 1962, has switched to racquetball, barely missing a stroke
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April 14, 1980

Mckay Has A New Racquet

Heather McKay, unbeaten in squash since 1962, has switched to racquetball, barely missing a stroke

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In field hockey she was just one of 11 women on her team. In squash she was invariably too good to be pressed. The textbook she co-wrote—Heather McKay's Complete Book of Squash—is filled with sound, conservative advice. "[To regain lost concentration] Don't hit any stupid shots or take any risky moves.... When you cut out the frills and theories, what you're trying to do on the court is move your opponent deep with one shot, then take him short with another, and somewhere between the rushing around smack a winner past him or in front of him or around him.... I don't advocate that you go for anything fancy in the way of an answer to a serve."

A restrained approach is understandable for someone who is invariably the favorite; McKay didn't have the best short game in women's squash for the simple reason that she has never had to learn one. But her advantage in racquetball is by no means as pronounced as it was in squash. She has lost some close racquetball games by missing simple ceiling shots and making other unforced errors. It's just another challenge, just another transition, but it will be interesting to see how she adjusts to it.

"You have to play perfectly to beat her," says Sarah Green, one of three tour players who has. "You know you can't psych her or wear her down. She hasn't completed the changeover from squash yet, but when she does, it will be all over for the rest of us."

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