SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
September 08, 1980
OH, THOSE O'SSir:There were no real losers during the Oriole-Yankee series (Now (he Race Is On, Aug. 25). Both teams should take a bow for the excitement they provided. Baseball was never better.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
September 08, 1980

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

OH, THOSE O'S
Sir:
There were no real losers during the Oriole-Yankee series (Now (he Race Is On, Aug. 25). Both teams should take a bow for the excitement they provided. Baseball was never better.

Also, the O's proved once again that division leaders can still be produced without recourse to the owner's checkbook. That Yankee owner George Steinbrenner (or any owner, for that matter) is allowed to purchase new players this late in the season is outrageous, in my opinion. I sincerely hope that Oriole owner Edward Bennett Williams will not tamper with an already successful formula: Weaver + O's + farm teams = success.
PATRICIA A. MILKOWSKI
Baltimore

Sir:
Bird-watchers everywhere took delight in Steve Wulf's incisive story on the Orioles and their drubbing of the "Damn Yankees." However, let's hope that Wulf, among others, doesn't underestimate the considerable contribution of Steve Stone to the Baltimore cause. As of this writing Steve is 21-5 and the mainstay of the best pitching staff in baseball. Stone should not only win the Cy Young Award but also be seriously considered for American League MVP.
NELSON E. COFFIN
San Diego

Sir:
A manager or coach is just as vital a part of a team as the players are. But very rarely are these mentors fully recognized. It's about time SI gave its Sportsman of the Year award to a manager, and who's better than Earl Weaver, the Earl of Baltimore?
EDDIE WHITE
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.

Sir:
Manny Millan's shot on page 10 of No. 10 Terry Crowley's game-winning (1-0) hit with the Yankees' catcher, No. 10 Rick Cerone, looking on is another outstanding SI picture. Give it a 10!
JOHN J. FARRELLY
Milwaukee

JUMPING TO CONCLUSIONS
Sir:
I am a physical therapist in Oklahoma City. In your Aug. 11 article on the Moscow Olympics (How's This, Mrs. Mullory?) you showed pictures of East German high jumper Gerd Wessig jumping higher than he ever had before. What interested me was the narrow band around his left leg. From your photograph [see below] there appeared to be electrodes, with a wire running down his leg.

I am curious to know if he was wearing a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for control of pain or an electrical stimulator to improve his performance or what.
GARY PEABODY
Oklahoma City

?According to an East German journalist with whom SI's Anita Verschoth spoke, Wessig says, "It would be very nice if such things existed." Wessig went on to explain that he had a little trouble with the ligaments in his left knee, so he tied a tight bandage just below the knee to give it support, knotting the bandage toward the back. What appears to be a wire leading from the bandage lo his sock, Wessig says, is probably a thread that had become unraveled. Verschoth adds that there was no suggestion of unfair play by East German athletes or officials at the Games.—ED.

JIMMY'S NEW SPORT
Sir:
As a flytier and fly fisherman, and also an environmentalist and conservationist, I was excited by the item in SCORECARD (Aug. 25) on President Carter's interest in the sport. To have the most important person in our government sharing the pleasures of flytying and flyfishing is indeed a pleasant thought. This is a time when more and more of our rivers, streams, lakes and ponds are threatened in various ways, and our government and its agencies can do much to help.
WILLIAM F. OSTROWSKI
Stafford Springs, Conn.

Sir:
Think again about the President's secret fishing hideaway no longer being secret. If SI keeps the gawking tourists circling around Franklin, Pa., Carter will have all the privacy he wants while fishing Spruce Creek.

Continue Story
1 2